"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-14-2009, 12:58 AM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: CA
Posts: 23
Its VERY easy to do, just takes some time. But at least you know when it was cooked vs. grabbing it from under a heat lamp.

I clean the chicken, dry it, rub oil on it, put some salt and pepper on it, chill it for 4 hrs. stuff some onion and celery in it and cook it at 450. Boy does it smoke up the house, but they are some of the best chickens I have ever had.
__________________

__________________
GHPoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2009, 01:52 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kadesma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: california
Posts: 21,373
As several others have suggested rub your chicken all over with an herb butter I don't know what you prefer, but, we love butter, some garlic, fresh chopped parsley and either chives or thyme..I lift the skin off the breast and legs, it takes a few minutes being careful not to rip the skin, then take the soft herb butter and put it under the skin and then you can rub on top of the skin to spread it around the breast and onto the meat of the legs.Use whats left on the out side of the chicken. I put the chicken onto a bed of cut veggies to keep it from resting on the floor of the pan..I put it into a 400 oven for 15 minutes, then lower the temp to 325 and continue cooking til juices run clear about an hour and a half with my oven.. Hope this helps a little
kadesma
__________________

__________________
HEAVEN is Cade, Ethan,Carson, and Olivia,Alyssa,Gianna
kadesma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2009, 10:35 AM   #13
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 3,102
kadesma ~ the veggies is a great idea. The one I did was crisp on the top, juicy on the bottom because it sat in its own juices. I've done beer can chicken and it's totally different because it sits up. I'll definitely try the bed of veggies next time.
__________________
Callisto in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2009, 10:52 AM   #14
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
You have now seen a number of techniques mentioned. They are very different. Slow & low, hot sear followed by slow roast, fast roast, medium roast, steaming. I'm talking about cooking temps above. And they will all give you great chicken, if you time them just right.

I have been cooking for my family, an many friends on various occasions, for over thirty years. I'm an engineering kind of guy, and a bit of a scientist, and a lover of great food. And so, I have experimented with many ways to bake, roast, broil, grill, fry, and barbecue chicken. There is one constant to all meat cooking techniques; and that is to remove the bird when the internal meat temperature is just right. And just what is that magic temperature? The perfect meat temperature is (drum roll please) 155 degrees F. Ta-da.

Following the roasting process, and removal of the bird when it reaches 155, you need to allow the chicken to rest. It will continure vcooking from the hotter meat surface into the inner meat. The final temperature, after 15 minutes is 165. This will insure safe meat without overcooking it.

I won't go into the "how temperature affects meat" in this discussion. Rather, I'm going to echo the others. Rub with fat, be it peanut oil, sesame oil, butter, olive oil, or even bacon fat. Lightly season with salt and any other herbs and spices you want to use. You can fill the cavity with aromatics or not. It doesn't affect the texture or tenderness of the chicken. If you want to enhance the meat flavor, inject with chicken broth, or rub seasonings under the skin before cooking, or brine. Again, it won't affect the meat texture. If you want crispy skin, cook in a hot oven (425 to 450 degrees F.). If you don't want smoke in your house, cook at a lower temperature (325 to 375). And that constant I was talking about, meat temperature, use a meat thermometer you can leave in the bird while roasting. Allow ten minutes per pound with high temp. roasting, or 12 minutes a pound with low temp roasting. Start checking the thermometer when the time has elapsed. You won't quite have reached the desired meat temp of 155 yet, but should be within 5 to 10 degrees of it. After that, check in 10 minute intervals until the thermometer reads 155. Remove the bird from the oven and let it sit for a minimum of ten minutes before carving to allow the meat juices that have accumulated just under the skin to re-distribute themselves back into the meat. Your chicken will be perfect.

Ideas for ways to flavor your bird:
1. Wrap uncooked bird in raw bacon. Set on a wire rack elevated above the roasting pan bottom. Roast at 375 for 40 minutes, then remove the bacon. Place back into the oven and cook to the proper meat temperature of 155. Use accumulated juices to make gravy.

2. Rub the cleaned and dried chicken with butter. make a mixture of 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 tsp garlic powder, 1/2 tsp marjarom, 1/4 tsp each of thyme and sage, and 1/2 tsp. black pepper. Sprinkle all over the chicken. Place on elevated wire rack in roasting pan and roast until meat thermometer reads 155.

3. Using a sharp boning or paring knife, insert knife blade deep into the chicken meat, through the skin. Alternately fill the slits with sprigs of rosemary and pork fat. Place on elevated rack and roast at 350 until meat reads 155.

4. Create your favorite rub mixture and rub it under the skin. Rub softened butter or oil all over the skin surface. Lightly season the skin with salt and pepper. Place on rack and roast at 425 until meat reads 155.

5. Make a glazing solution of water, honey, and sage. Start with maybe a cup of water with 2 tbs. honey. Taste and see if it's sweet enough for you. brush glaze over the entire bird. Place uncovered into you refridgerator and let sit for 15 minutes or so. Brush again and place onto an elevated wire rack in the roasting pan. Roast at 350 for 15 minutes. Brush with more glaze. Roast 15 minutes more and brush with glaze. Continue this routine until the meat reads 155.

Other glazes can be honey mustard, teryaki, peach or appricot, orange juice, sweet & sour, barbecue sauce, etc.

With all of the above techniques, you can place veggies such as celery, onions, chunks of celriac (celery root), rutabegga, green beans, potatoes, carrots, or whatever you like in the pan bottom along with a cup and a half of water. This will allow the dripping juices to flavor the veggies as everything roasts. You will be rewarded with an incredible broth for gravy, and some very tasty veggies.

In summary, no matter what technique you use, remove the chicken from the oven at 155 and let rest for 10 to 20 minutes. You can't go wrong from there.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2009, 01:15 PM   #15
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Georgia
Posts: 218
There are a couple of places that have sales for rot. chicken...$4.99 is the norm and I can sometimes find as low as $3.99. Factor in every little expense, cost of chicken, veggies, butter and spices...Electricity for the oven, dishwasher, hot water heater, cost of the water and soap...It can be near impossible to do it for under $3.99. I do agree with you all, you can make it better yourself.
__________________
Bacardi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2009, 06:26 PM   #16
Senior Cook
 
stinemates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Petaluma, CA
Posts: 250
Send a message via AIM to stinemates Send a message via MSN to stinemates Send a message via Yahoo to stinemates Send a message via Skype™ to stinemates
450 degree oven, roasted with salt and pepper.

Amazing.

You should try it.
__________________
stinemates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2009, 09:29 PM   #17
Cook
 
Nils Hoyum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Saint Paul, Minnesota
Posts: 75
Read my article on the subject. It's super easy to follow with photos!
How to Roast a Chicken
Enjoy!
__________________
Check out my website How to Cook Meat!
Nils Hoyum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 04:38 AM   #18
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Beautiful Brooklyn NY
Posts: 325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bacardi View Post
There are a couple of places that have sales for rot. chicken...$4.99 is the norm and I can sometimes find as low as $3.99. Factor in every little expense, cost of chicken, veggies, butter and spices...Electricity for the oven, dishwasher, hot water heater, cost of the water and soap...It can be near impossible to do it for under $3.99. I do agree with you all, you can make it better yourself.
Here in Brooklyn rot. chickens go for 6.99, on sale for 5.99.
They weigh appx 2.5 lbs Raw chicken is usually about .99/lb sometimes as
low as .69 sometimes as high as 1.19.
I usually roast in a disposable aluminum pan (.30) - no clean up
__________________
anything that does not kill me makes me stronger
mike in brooklyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 10:16 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
I have to admit that I haven't roasted a chicken in the oven in many years now - not since my husband gifted me with one of those Ron Popeil "Showtime" rotisseries. Lord I use that appliance more than nearly anything else in my kitchen. Mouthwatering, juicy, all-over-crispy-skinned chicken (& duck, & turkey parts, etc., etc.) & very minimal cleanup.

I'll also suggest that if the skin isn't a requirement for your recipe, you can just as easily "poach" a whole chicken in a large stockpot & end up with a goodly amount of chicken broth at the same time for other recipes &/or the freezer.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2009, 11:30 AM   #20
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Beautiful Brooklyn NY
Posts: 325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saraaaaa View Post
I have to admit I never roast a chicken from scratch myself. I used to love the apple-stuffed small chicken (seasoned and ready to roast) from Whole Foods and stick it in the oven. So tasty!!!
Hi Saraaa (my daughter is Sarah) - just curious - how mch is
an apple stuffed chicken from Whole Foods in Chi?
I am financially fearsome of ever going to shop in WF.
Last winter I made Gravlox for a family get-together and I wanted wild Salmon.
Whole Foods NY wanted $38 lb for wild Salmon - I eventually found it for
$13.
__________________

__________________
anything that does not kill me makes me stronger
mike in brooklyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.