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Old 09-03-2006, 04:47 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Here in the US - Chicken Tenders is basically a name given to one of 4 different products:

1) compressed shaped and formed scraps or white meat
2) compressed shaped and formed scraps of dark meat
3) compressed shaped and formed scraps of both dark and white meat
4) compressed breast tenderloins

You have to read the "ingredients" list on the back of the package to know what you are getting.
What do you call the inch or so strip of white meat under the back bone?
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Old 09-03-2006, 07:27 AM   #12
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I don't know that I agree with Michael. When I see them in the supermarket they are the breast tenderloin--the small "tender" that separates from the breast.
I HATE brined poultry (salt water brined) although apparently the way I have always fixed my baked chicken and T'giving turkey is now called "dry brine". I liberally season the skin with Morton's Natural Season Salt or just sea salt and pepper.
Marinating in buttermilk (it isn't really brining) is a good method but only for an hour or so. It does have tenderizing characteristics. Give a nice tang to the coating.
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Old 09-03-2006, 08:12 AM   #13
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I called them tenders for ease of description. What they actually were - were boneless chicken breast then I cut them into strips. Granchildren were coming and They both love their "Chicken Nuggets" and "Chicken Fingers" I ended up taking them out of the buttermilk and then cooking them the next day for lunch. They came out great. I alway soak in buttermilk with alittle hot sauce in it. I purchase the powder version of buttermilk, so I don't have to remenber to buy it. It work just as good. Thanks for all the responses.
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Old 09-03-2006, 09:15 AM   #14
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I call them that too for making "fingers". As for what Michael posted, it is true that the ubiquitous "nuggets" that are available already breaded can really have mystery meat in them.
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Old 09-03-2006, 11:00 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
What do you call the inch or so strip of white meat under the back bone?
Under the backbone, you have the oyster but I don't think it's white.

The tender is located near the keel or breast bone.
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Old 10-12-2006, 02:18 PM   #16
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Marinating Chicken - How Long?

Quote:
Originally Posted by letscook
Had chicken tenders marnating for supper but then change of plans and went out for supper. Opinions on whether leave then till tommorrow lunch or take them out of the buttermilk. thanks
I also have plans to marinate a chicken, in preparation for roasting in a convection oven, for dinner tonight. I was wondering what would be the most appropriate amount of time for the marinating, to prevent any damage done to the meat. (I was told not to marinate overnight).

I've been using a recipe of preserved lemon, rosemary in pickling salt (I'd started several jars of this marinade over 6 months ago) as my favorite marinade for a Roasted Lemon Chicken (whole). I've also been using a stainless steel vertical roasting rack in a teflon-coated pie-pan of water for the roast.
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Old 10-12-2006, 02:25 PM   #17
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Didn't realized you posted here - check my PM - I told you we have a bunch of people here eager to give answers! I would still like to know what the wet ingredient is you will be marinating in or if it's a rub.

Looking forward to reading it later (while I'm at work )
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Old 10-12-2006, 02:27 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akwx
I was wondering what would be the most appropriate amount of time for the marinating, to prevent any damage done to the meat. (I was told not to marinate overnight)..
It's a whole chicken? You can do overnight depending on what's in the marinade. Since you are going to cook it tonight, I'd say, for a whole chicken, maybe 4 hours. 6 would work, 2's probably the minimum, IMO.
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Old 10-12-2006, 02:58 PM   #19
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re: Marinating Chicken - How Long?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
Didn't realized you posted here - check my PM - I told you we have a bunch of people here eager to give answers! I would still like to know what the wet ingredient is you will be marinating in or if it's a rub.

Looking forward to reading it later (while I'm at work )
When I go to use the Preserved Lemon & Rosemary in Pickling Salt, I would usually put 3 sections of lemon (each lemon was originally cut into 6 sections for the pickling), along with some of the salty lemon juice in the jar, into a small blender and turn the whole works into a puree.

So to answer your question, I would say it is more of a Rub, rather than a Marinade.
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Old 10-12-2006, 03:18 PM   #20
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If it is a rub then I would have no problem going 24 hours.
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