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Old 11-30-2015, 02:10 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
When the flour is first browned it has been dextrinized.
" Best Answer: 1) When flour is heated until brown, the starch granules undergo a process known as dextrinization. Dextrins are fragments of starch molecules composed of chains of glucose molecules. When they are dissolved in water, they have a sweet taste, and contribute to the color and pleasant flavor of brown gravies. As the starch undergoes dextrinization, it loses its thickening power. Extensive dextrinization, as occurs when flour is browned with dry heat, may cut the thickening power by as much as one half. " Once I started dextrinizing the flour the result was/is an excellent tasting gravy somewhat lighter than a gravy using non-dextrinized flour.
For cooks who like to experiment try dextrinizing the APF. See what you think.
The only tricky part is understanding how much flour to use.
Interesting info Puffin.
Last year I made a large amount of med/dark roux ahead of time in anticipation of making the gravy the following day at my sons house. Good thing he had some flour in the house to make a slurry as the roux did next to nothing to thicken the gravy.
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Old 11-30-2015, 02:38 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
... I always cook my roux to the color I am pairing with. Beef gravy gets a darker color and turkey gets a lighter color.
My gravies get their color from the stock, not the roux. As puffin3 noted, the darker the roux, the less thickening power it has.
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Old 12-01-2015, 11:51 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Well, it gets into the stock one way or the other. What you do with the stock after that doesn't matter. I don't see how putting some in each bowl is different from putting all of it into the stock.
You don't think a dollop of very dark drippings in the middle of a pale soup would stand out? I don't think you understand what a floater is?
Ever had a "Seabreeze"? Its a cocktail with a jigger of Myers rum on top.


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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
My gravies get their color from the stock, not the roux. As puffin3 noted, the darker the roux, the less thickening power it has.
Mine get it from both. Roasted veggies lean towards a darker stock. Darker roux also leans to a darker end result.
Now I know you know this, but this is how you respond to my posts.
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Old 12-01-2015, 12:04 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
You don't think a dollop of very dark drippings in the middle of a pale soup would stand out? I don't think you understand what a floater is?
Ever had a "Seabreeze"? Its a cocktail with a jigger of Myers rum on top.
I didn't realize your turkey soup is light-colored. Mine is dark because the stock is dark.

I do know what a floater is. I also know that in order to float, a liquid has to have lower density than what it's floating on. Drippings do not have a lower density than stock, so they won't float. Unless you're making creamy turkey soup. I was assuming it was a brothy soup.

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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Mine get it from both. Roasted veggies lean towards a darker stock. Darker roux also leans to a darker end result.
Now I know you know this, but this is how you respond to my posts.
How do you get a pale soup from a dark stock?

I really don't know what you mean by that last comment.
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Old 12-02-2015, 12:12 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I didn't realize your turkey soup is light-colored. Mine is dark because the stock is dark.

I do know what a floater is. I also know that in order to float, a liquid has to have lower density than what it's floating on. Drippings do not have a lower density than stock, so they won't float. Unless you're making creamy turkey soup. I was assuming it was a brothy soup.



How do you get a pale soup from a dark stock?

I really don't know what you mean by that last comment.
I understand about the floating or not floating part. But if I put a dollop (I'm trying to decide if I should try it) of dark drippings, it should remain somewhat visible and add to the appearance and taste of the soup? I have never tried doing this and I would hate to take those concentrated drippings and just dump them into a large pot of soup. But its looking more and more like i might just do that and do it at the end when I add the noodles.

The stock left over from thanksgiving is dark, the bones I am braising at this moment are going to produce a light colored result. I will mix them together near the end.
So to be honest, I'm not sure what color the end will be. I'm certain the addition of the drippings will for sure darken it.

The last comment was in regards to your instruction on simple technique.
Things I already know.
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Old 12-02-2015, 01:28 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I understand about the floating or not floating part. But if I put a dollop (I'm trying to decide if I should try it) of dark drippings, it should remain somewhat visible and add to the appearance and taste of the soup? I have never tried doing this and I would hate to take those concentrated drippings and just dump them into a large pot of soup. But its looking more and more like i might just do that and do it at the end when I add the noodles.

The last comment was in regards to your instruction on simple technique.
Things I already know.
I don't understand why you object to adding drippings to soup, but okay. Give the "dollop" a try.

Pardon me for not being a mind reader I don't know what you already know. I'm just trying to be helpful.
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Turkey Gravy This is the gravy I make after I've prepared the [URL]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f15/herb-roasted-turkey-52425.html[/URL] (Baked in Oven Cooking Bag), and may I say it's some of "the best" tasting gravy I've ever had. I let the pan drippings sit overnight (in a glass bowl with a lid) in the refrigerator. The next day the fat hardens and comes to the surface of the bowl, which I then scrape it off, and make the gravy. (See *Note before preparing the gravy.) [SIZE=3]Turkey Gravy [/SIZE] 2 cups turkey drippings 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper 1/4 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1 teaspoon chicken bouillon granules 1/4 cup flour 1 tablespoon flour 1/2 cup milk Combine the turkey drippings, pepper, poultry seasoning, and bouillon granules in a 1-quart saucepan; simmer over low heat for 5 minutes. While the pan drippings and spices are heating, combine the flour (the 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon) along the milk, in a jar with a tight fitting lid; shake until ingredients become smooth. Slowly add the milk mixture into the simmering broth; stirring constantly with a spoon. Continue to cook and stir, until the gravy is thick and bubbly, then serve. Yields: 2-1/2 cups of gravy *Note: If I roast a 19 lb. bird, I am able to double the gravy ingredients, and then I'll add the already cooked, cut-up turkey meat into the gravy. The gravy and turkey meat taste great served over hot-cooked mashed potatoes. Also, whenever I double the recipe, I then prepare the gravy in a 3-quart saucepan. 3 stars 1 reviews
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