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Old 01-27-2016, 09:16 PM   #11
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I use self rising flour only for certain cakes and biscuits. All other applications and recipes, all purpose flour. Even for bread. I just have to knead it for slightly longer.
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Old 01-28-2016, 11:18 AM   #12
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Ok thanks for this SR flour uses backing powder. But I have only seen Plain and SR flour also strong flour in supermarkets.

Never heard of Bread or hard. didn't realise so many different ones. This needs more research on flour. I take it AP is the same as plane?

Also the recipe calls for
1 tbsp olive oil, (not extra virgin) plus extra for drizzling
I thought extra virgin was the oil to use always.
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Old 01-28-2016, 01:10 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by otuatail View Post
I thought extra virgin was the oil to use always.
Not unless you're Rachael Ray. Heating Extra Virgin Olive Oil destroys the flavour and a lot of the nutrients. I use light flavored olive oil for sautéing and Extra Virgin as a finishing oil.
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Old 01-28-2016, 01:30 PM   #14
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Not unless you're Rachael Ray. Heating Extra Virgin Olive Oil destroys the flavour and a lot of the nutrients .


Sorry but that's a myth ...

https://www.google.com/search?source...ting+nutrients
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Old 01-28-2016, 03:37 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otuatail View Post
Ok thanks for this SR flour uses backing powder. But I have only seen Plain and SR flour also strong flour in supermarkets.

Never heard of Bread or hard. didn't realise so many different ones. This needs more research on flour. I take it AP is the same as plane?

Also the recipe calls for
1 tbsp olive oil, (not extra virgin) plus extra for drizzling
I thought extra virgin was the oil to use always.
Bread flour is simply high-protein flour - it's what we call strong flour here in the United States. Just use plain (what we call all-purpose) flour and yeast.

I have several different oils that I use for different purposes - canola for most sautéing and roasting, corn for Mexican, peanut and sesame for Asian, grocery-store extra virgin olive oil for my everyday Italian salad dressing and some cooking, and specialty extra virgin olive oil for finishing and for crostini and garlic bread.
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Old 01-28-2016, 03:40 PM   #16
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Rachael Ray is a myth?
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Old 04-25-2016, 03:00 PM   #17
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I tried making pizza last week and I was awful at rolling it out. I tried to do it with hands and it went kind of square, but the main problem was that the dough was just too elastic. It got a certain size and, when I tried to stretch it further, it would just shrink back to the original size. Does anyone know why that happens and how to get it thinner?

I thought using a very strong flour would allow me to stretch it further without breaking, but it seems it doesn't allow me to stretch it far at all. Am I doing something wrong?
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Old 04-25-2016, 03:18 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Suthseaxa View Post
I tried making pizza last week and I was awful at rolling it out. I tried to do it with hands and it went kind of square, but the main problem was that the dough was just too elastic. It got a certain size and, when I tried to stretch it further, it would just shrink back to the original size. Does anyone know why that happens and how to get it thinner?

I thought using a very strong flour would allow me to stretch it further without breaking, but it seems it doesn't allow me to stretch it far at all. Am I doing something wrong?
When it does that, you need to cover it and let it rest for 10 minutes or so, then try again.

You might like to read this for more details on flours and doughs: The Pizza Lab: On Flour Types, Foams, and Dough | Serious Eats
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Old 04-25-2016, 03:50 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suthseaxa View Post
I tried making pizza last week and I was awful at rolling it out. I tried to do it with hands and it went kind of square, but the main problem was that the dough was just too elastic. It got a certain size and, when I tried to stretch it further, it would just shrink back to the original size. Does anyone know why that happens and how to get it thinner?

I thought using a very strong flour would allow me to stretch it further without breaking, but it seems it doesn't allow me to stretch it far at all. Am I doing something wrong?
When it keeps snapping or shrinking back on you, walk away. Let the dough rest for about ten minutes, then go back to working it. Depending of the size you are going for, you may need to do this several times. While you are waiting and your dough is resting, you can be gathering your toppings and heating up your oven. You need to give the gluten a rest. The shape is normally round, but not necessarily the perfect way. Lots of pizzas are served square, oblong or any other shape. Some talented folks make them in the shape of Mickey Mouse, or other shapes familiar to children for children's parties. What kid doesn't love pizza.

Most of the members here just use all purpose flour. It is easier to work with. And you will get a more tender crust.

The world of pizza is so huge. It is no longer just an Italian treat. The fame of this delight has gone worldwide.
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Old 04-25-2016, 11:46 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suthseaxa View Post
I tried making pizza last week and I was awful at rolling it out. I tried to do it with hands and it went kind of square, but the main problem was that the dough was just too elastic. It got a certain size and, when I tried to stretch it further, it would just shrink back to the original size. Does anyone know why that happens and how to get it thinner?

I thought using a very strong flour would allow me to stretch it further without breaking, but it seems it doesn't allow me to stretch it far at all. Am I doing something wrong?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
When it keeps snapping or shrinking back on you, walk away. Let the dough rest for about ten minutes, then go back to working it. Depending of the size you are going for, you may need to do this several times. While you are waiting and your dough is resting, you can be gathering your toppings and heating up your oven. You need to give the gluten a rest. The shape is normally round, but not necessarily the perfect way. Lots of pizzas are served square, oblong or any other shape. Some talented folks make them in the shape of Mickey Mouse, or other shapes familiar to children for children's parties. What kid doesn't love pizza.

Most of the members here just use all purpose flour. It is easier to work with. And you will get a more tender crust.

The world of pizza is so huge. It is no longer just an Italian treat. The fame of this delight has gone worldwide.
My pizzas come in all manner of odd shapes. I only do personal sized crusts, about 8 inches, so that each guest can top it to his own preferences. I only concern myself with getting the crust even in thickness. Shape just isn't much of a worry.
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