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Old 01-25-2018, 09:48 AM   #41
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In the US shrimp scampi means shrimp prepared with garlic, oil / butter, lemon and herbs usually served over pasta. Langoustines (or scampi as you call them) do not grow in North American waters, and are generally not available.
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Old 01-25-2018, 09:50 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brasato View Post
Hi from Italy.
I have a curiosity.
In italian shrimp mean...shrimp and scampi mean langoustines, but I see many american recipes called "shrimp scampi" where only shrimps are used. So I'm curious to understand what is intended in usa with the word scampi, considering that scampi is an italian word (the plural of scampo to be precise) to indentify langoustines, but it seems that in usa identifies something else.
Buongiorno. ""shrimp scampi" refers to a dish made with shrimp cooked on the stovetop with a white wine and butter sauce.
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Old 01-25-2018, 10:00 AM   #43
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Thank you very much both for the answers.
@tenspeed we have scampi (lagoustines) in the mediterranean, they are delicious (in my opinion the best way is to eat them raw) but they are really really expensive, the big ones cost not less than 30/35 euros/kilo.
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Old 01-25-2018, 10:32 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brasato View Post
Hi from Italy.
I have a curiosity.
In italian shrimp mean...shrimp and scampi mean langoustines, but I see many american recipes called "shrimp scampi" where only shrimps are used. So I'm curious to understand what is intended in usa with the word scampi, considering that scampi is an italian word (the plural of scampo to be precise) to indentify langoustines, but it seems that in usa identifies something else.
Hello, my family came to the US from Torino. When you consider that we call most Italian cites by a different name here in the US, it is not surprising that someone from Italy would be confused. We call Torino, Turin, and Firenze, Florence. It all goes back to Italian immigrants, like my great-grandparents, Americanizing in order to fit in, and become Americans. Here in the US, my own last name is pronounced wrong, but I'm used to it.

Shrimp Scampi is an example of that. It is like fajitas from Mexico. Fajita is skirt steak, yet in the US, we eat chicken fajitas... or chicken steak. Technically, it makes no sense, but the name "chicken fajitas" has become normal. In the same way, Shrimp Scampi has become normal.

Italian immigrants in the early 1900s, like my great-grandparents, adapted recipes from Italy to use ingredients that were abundant here in America. They had to do that, since it was not practical to import ingredients from Italy.

Here, shrimp scampi is actually shrimp, most of it from the Gulf of Mexico, that is cooked in butter and garlic. Why? Because Gulf shrimp are abundant here.

Italian food here is different than Italian food in Italy. That came from necessity. Italian immigrants 100 years ago cooked with what was abundant here.

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Old 01-25-2018, 02:07 PM   #45
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Here is part of a menu from the restaurant where we had lunch in Vernazza on the Cinque Terra. Aside from some odd phraseology in some of the translations, I do see "shrimp" listed as an ingredient in the first dish on the page.

I took the photo to memorialize the third item on the page. We hoped that it was a case of something being lost in translation, but it didn't sound appetizing.



We ate at that table on the balcony right above the guy reading a book.

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Old 01-25-2018, 05:45 PM   #46
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Wow, what a cool place to have lunch. I'll assume the man below you was wearing pants.

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Old 01-25-2018, 06:08 PM   #47
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Lol, dinner and a show.
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Old 01-26-2018, 07:34 AM   #48
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His pants were probably as big as the girls' on the next level down. LOL
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