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Old 03-16-2012, 02:11 PM   #21
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Terrines of fish flesh -- aka fishcake, surimi, kamaboko -- is another alternative. Process and steam-cook with favored flavors. Serve them as steaks or punch them out into Mickey Mouse shapes.
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Old 03-16-2012, 03:14 PM   #22
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You guys are just the best ! There's plenty here to keep me going and loads for me to try myself :) I think a taste of the Italian would go down a treat as she loves Italian, she doesn't like the smell which puts her off the flavour so if I want to eat it I can't. There a grill and fish place near mine that I'd love to try out but due to her disinterest it's unlikely. Once again thanks guys if I can help you guys I know Italian and sauces and anything English :)
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Old 03-16-2012, 04:52 PM   #23
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I had a friend that wouldn't go near fish. It turned out that being from a good Irish family, his mother served fish every Friday. The problem was she never removed the bones. So he developed an intense dislike for fish. I made no attempt to get him to eat it. We each have our likes and dislikes.
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Old 03-16-2012, 09:57 PM   #24
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We probably eat more fish than any other kind of meat. I love it and like the simple preparations the best. Just a little olive oil, and a few herbs.

The real "trick" with fish is not to overcook it. If you overcook it, it gets dry and mealy.
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Old 03-16-2012, 10:13 PM   #25
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I love to take a nice piece of Haddock and poach it in crushed tomatoes with a little basil, S&P. Sole is another fish that is very good poached. The fillet stays moist and flaky.
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Old 03-17-2012, 04:07 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie
I had a friend that wouldn't go near fish. It turned out that being from a good Irish family, his mother served fish every Friday. The problem was she never removed the bones. So he developed an intense dislike for fish. I made no attempt to get him to eat it. We each have our likes and dislikes.
Oh really, I think it's because her mum only ever makes battered frozen fish which lacks taste and imagination so something exotic might change her mind, likes and dislikes care to expand 
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Old 03-17-2012, 04:42 AM   #27
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Salmon is one of my favorites. Perhaps a Wellington dish (wrapped in puff pastry) will WoW her.

For example:

Salmon Wellington Recipe - Taste.com.au

Fish tacos with a squeeze of lime juice, with coleslaw or shredded lettuce, tomatoes, avocado or guacamole, is a good way to ease into fish dishes.
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:00 AM   #28
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Fried Flounder. No dipping or soaking in any egg or milk. Just dredged in a mix of cornmeal, small amount of flour, ground sea salt, ground peppercorns and lemon and herb Old Bay seasoning. Then fried in a small amount of canola oil. The fish was delicate and mild in flavor. NO fish smell raw, during cooking or after cooking.


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Old 03-17-2012, 11:27 AM   #29
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MzMo! Now that's what I'm talkinbout!
But, it looks like fish, and for some people, that's the first barrier.
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:32 AM   #30
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I can provide a couple of outside the norm recipes if you think you're up for the challenge. One is a Vietnamese fusion type dish from Ana Mandara in San Francisco and the other is strictly Italian, from Scoma's, also in San Francisco. Neither is overly complicated, but you will have to do some real work to prepare these fine entrées. You don't just throw them together.


MAHI-MAHI IN COCONUT CARAMEL SAUCE




Marinade:
  • 4 Tbs sesame oil
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup lite soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup hoi sin sauce
  • 2 tsp turbinado sugar
  • 1 Tbs chili garlic sauce
  • 2 tsp Chinese five spice
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
Sauce:

  • 2 cups demerara sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
  • 1/4 cup minced shallots
  • 1 Tbs minced fresh ginger
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • 2 scallions, white and green parts, sliced very thin
Marinate mahi-mahi fillets for at least one hour, but no more than 4 hours.

In a sauté pan or skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Dry fish fillets with paper towels, season with salt and pepper, dredge in flour, and sauté until cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Fish is cooked through when it flakes easily with a fork. Remove fish and keep warm.
Place sugar in a 10- to 12-inch frying pan over medium heat. Whisk sugar until it is melted and dark amber colored, 3 to 5 minutes. Add 1/2 cup coconut milk. Mixture will bubble vigorously! Stir over medium heat until caramelized sugar is dissolved. Stir in fish sauce, shallots, ginger, garlic, and remaining coconut milk and stir over medium-high heat until desired thickness. Pour sauce over plated fish fillet, then sprinkle with fresh ground black pepper to taste and garnish with green onions.

I usually serve this with steamed brown rice and Asian style vegetables.


Snapper Romano


Ingredients:

Fish
  • 4 Pacific rock cod, or other firm fleshed fish, fillets
  • 1 cup all pourpose flour
  • 2 Tbs olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
Sauce
  • 1 tsp garlic, finely chopped
  • ½ tsp lemon juice
  • 2 Tbs butter, cubed and slightly chilled
  • 2 Tbs Mushroom, sliced
  • 2 Tbs yellow onion, sliced
  • 1 scallion, white part only, sliced
  • ¼ tsp oregano
  • 2 cups marinara sauce
  • 1 cup bay shrimp
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions:

In a sauté pan or skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Dry fish fillets with paper towels, season with salt and pepper, dredge in flour, and sauté until cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Fish is cooked through when it flakes easily with a fork. Remove fish and keep warm.

Add garlic to the sauté pan and cook, stirring constantly, until it just starts to get golden brown, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat, add lemon juice and butter and swirl the pan until butter just melts. Add mushroom, onion, scallion, and oregano and sauté until soft. Add the marinara and shrimp and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour sauce over fish fillets.

I generally serve this with some type of small macaroni such as fusilli or farfalle tossed with extra olive virgin oil and Peccorino Romano and Italian green beans.
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