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Old 08-31-2008, 11:28 PM   #11
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Your friend has my sympathy, understanding and admiration. Although they were not diabetic - I went through something similar with my dad for a year and then my step-mom for the next 12. And, your friend is dealing with more than just a diabetic diet ... although that does complicate things.

As people get older their taste changes (perception of flavors). Different medications can mute or alter flavors. It also sounds like there is some dementia (either from age, disease or past brain damage). And, I sure know about asking what they wanted to eat before I started cooking (even if only 3-minutes to heat in the microwave) they could change their minds before I got it on the table.

Before any of us can logically suggest recipes for your friend we really need to know:

1) What foods does she like?
2) What food does she not like?
3) What foods did she used to cook?
4) What foods does she eat that she does not complain about?

Being able to recreate dishes his mom likes (even adjusted to the diabetic diet) may trigger "comfort" memories that will get her to eat ... no guarantee, but it's a good place to start. Armed with a list of foods/dishes she likes and dislikes - I bet you/he will get a lot of ideas that are more relevant and less speculative. The more your friend can remember - the more options he has to work from.
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Old 08-31-2008, 11:38 PM   #12
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Your friend has my admiration for taking care of his Mother. I am very familiar with aged persons changing their mind before the dish hits the table. My late wife was that way and it was extremely hard to cook for her, what she liked today she would all but throw it at me the next time I fixed it. Tell your friend to have a big helping of patients and understanding that aged folks do not operate the way they used to and it can be very hard to cope with them.
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Old 09-07-2008, 12:10 AM   #13
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i have not been able to find out what she was used to eating so that has not been a big option lately. just to update, she has been doing better. now more family has been involved to keep her happy and interested in feeling, eating and basicly getting well. all of your posts have helped in some way so thanks again.
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Old 09-07-2008, 01:47 AM   #14
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Thanks for letting us know what is going on! I was wondering ...
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Old 09-12-2008, 07:07 AM   #15
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My husband's doctor says if he and the dietician hadn't diagnosed him themselves they wouldn't believe the results. But the problem is motivation, and with an older person sometimes it just isn't there. hubby hates needles, and I have very shaky hands (a genetic disposition). Trust me, no one in their right mind wants me to put a needle into them. For him it was more a case of spreading the food out. 1/2 c carbs for breakfast and lunch, 1 at supper (this is assuming pasta, potatoes or rice. for bread you have to check the carb count on the pkg). Fruit mid-morning and mid-afternoon; triscuits with PB before bed. He isn't eating less, just spreading it around, and eating that ****ed fruit whether he wants it or not. But if someone isn't motivated to improve the problem, it's hard to force them.
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Old 09-16-2008, 11:14 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sichuan dingdong View Post
do any of you know tasty recipes that could help her enjoy eating again without putting her at risk?
Two of the many facets of maintaining good health as a diabetic are:
one- what you take in (eat)
two- how you treat what you take in (insulin required)

Appropriately monitoring both should result in little or no risk.

Speak to the treating endocrinologist about a sliding insulin scale and/or the use of a combination of slow and fast acting insulin. This can give more play in what foods can be served and add a little spontaneity in food choices.

The use of a glucometer is highly recommended, as well as keeping accurate records of her blood sugar levels.
A consultation with a certified dietician will certainly help round out the plan for good eating and good health.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sichuan dingdong View Post
now with the blood sugar effecting her thinking
I do not think that blood sugar affects thinking in this manner.
Her thinking may only be affected if her blood sugar is way too low or way too high.
In both cases her diabetes is not in control and at this point I really would not pay much attention to what she ask to eat but rather pay attention to bringing her blood sugar levels back into line with what is normal as quickly and safely as possible.

Over time diabetes affects the circulatory system and this may result in diminished blood flow to the brain. This will affect thinking.
It is a secondary affect of diabetes and not the affect of normally fluctuating levels of blood sugar.

IF you believe her thinking is affected beyond the mild damage she has already suffered it is a good idea to get in touch with a geriatric specialist to have her assessed. As well the doctors that treat geriatric patients and their associated staff can also help you to communicate more effectively with the patient and lessen some of the difficulty and frustration.

Good Luck
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Old 09-16-2008, 11:24 PM   #17
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lovergrill - I don't think the OP is that involved with this person but your answer is very much appreciated. She is getting proper care through her doctors, etc. That is not being overlooked. The OP was simply looking for some miracle recipe to spark her passion for eating again - something familiar...something she wouldn't "poopoo" and complain about
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Old 09-16-2008, 11:52 PM   #18
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lovergrill - I don't think the OP is that involved with this person but your answer is very much appreciated. She is getting proper care through her doctors, etc. That is not being overlooked. The OP was simply looking for some miracle recipe to spark her passion for eating again - something familiar...something she wouldn't "poopoo" and complain about
Thanks for your take on that.

#1
The OP states "she is on a strict diet"
I wanted to highlight some techniques to lessen the rigidity of her menu.
The senior citizen in question does not like what she's being given to eat.
Under appropriate supervision, the ability to be a little more spontaneous with her food choices would go along way to giving her back some quality of life.

#2
I wanted to dispel any myth or suggestion that somehow blood sugar levels in diabetics affect their thinking.
A lot of diabetics would be very upset by that.

#3
Isn't this the Health, Nutrition and Special Diets forum

#4
You admins jump in a lot on this board.

Just my 2 cents again
Cheers Mr. Elf
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Old 09-17-2008, 12:14 AM   #19
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Sorry, but it's not Mr. Elf.

Like I said, your info, as stated, was appreciated. But the OP is not involved in her personally. For example:
Quote:
Speak to the treating endocrinologist about a sliding insulin scale and/or the use of a combination of slow and fast acting insulin. This can give more play in what foods can be served and add a little spontaneity in food choices.
This just isn't going to happen. Her family is on top of her medical attention and the OP is not her family. You are more than welcome to go into a lengthy explanation though.

Quote:
I wanted to dispel any myth or suggestion that somehow blood sugar levels in diabetics affect their thinking.
A lot of diabetics would be very upset by that.
Did you read the part of the thread where this woman had an accident and suffered mild brain damage? Maybe you missed that, I don't know. My mother was a diabetic and I can assure you she wasn't thinking right when her blood sugar levels were off so IMHO it does affect their thinking AND actions. Mean comes to mind

Admins jump in as anyone else would.
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Old 09-17-2008, 12:28 AM   #20
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Sorry, but it's not Mr. Elf.

Like I said, your info, as stated, was appreciated. But the OP is not involved in her personally. For example:


This just isn't going to happen. Her family is on top of her medical attention and the OP is not her family. You are more than welcome to go into a lengthy explanation though.



Did you read the part of the thread where this woman had an accident and suffered mild brain damage? Maybe you missed that, I don't know. My mother was a diabetic and I can assure you she wasn't thinking right when her blood sugar levels were off so IMHO it does affect their thinking AND actions. Mean comes to mind

Admins jump in as anyone else would.
Sorry about that Ms. Elf

Yes I read the posting and the OP states:
"now with the blood sugar effecting her thinking"

This is utter nonsense!

A diabetic is exactly the same as anyone else when their blood sugar is within the normal range.
If the sugar levels are so off that the persons thinking is affected it is time to call 911 and then go out and get a proper education on diabetes and diabetic care.

I get the feeling you did not read my posting.
I know others will and maybe, just maybe they will use the information to better the quality of life for someone they love.
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