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Old 05-24-2019, 02:52 PM   #1
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Question High fiber crackers for diabetics?

Please try making these with variations and give me some feed back?

I have been looking at recipes for almond or coconut flour crackers. But non of them have a good binder. Because there is a new concept that fat raises blood glucose. So what kind of fat has a bad effect?

I suspect that it is a lack of Omega3, and cooking is going to destroy Omega3, so maybe the recipe just needs to be very low on fat as well as carbohydrates. And people already know that taking undamaged Omega3 is important. Or the raw flax seed oil would not be so expensive.

I do not believe the hype about coconut oil even if I do like the taste, so it maybe better to use powdered full fat shredded coconut. And I do not believe that most people that are afraid of gluten are actually allergic to it. But it does have a lot of carbohydrate....and that is most likely the thing that makes people think they are allergic to it.

There is a lot of evidence that any kind of animal foods can be dangerous to ones health. So it could be good to find a binder other than eggs. Like the cooking liquid from garbanzo beans. I believe it is very high in fiber, so it acts as a binder when cooled.

Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body canít digest, so you should subtract the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate.
So I need a fiber counter or a carb counter that also subtracts fiber grams.

There is a lot of fat in the almond flour and I don't know how much fiber. But maybe it does not matter. In which case you could make coconut flour out of shredded coconut. I was looking at cracker labels and most do not have fiber at all. No wonder we are all sick.

Baking soda is salt so leave that out also. Sodium raises blood pressure and takes a lot of potassium to balance it out. And the potassium flushes threw and out while sodium stays and damages our arteries.
  • Coconut flour and/or Almond flour?
  • Flax seed fiber [ground seed] or Psyllium seed fiber??
  • chick pea liquid left over from cooking [or egg]
  • Spike for the top [in place of salt] or some other spice/herb.
  • Coconut oil [melted] {Coconut flour absorbs a lot of liquid so add oil after it has absorbed what it can.}

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Old 05-24-2019, 03:55 PM   #2
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Mary's Gone Crackers (very expensive)
Wasa Rye Crisp bread (very inexpensive)
(google search 'vegan no oil cracker recipes')
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Old 05-24-2019, 04:36 PM   #3
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Another vote for Wasa!

Ryvita is another good product.

https://www.ryvita.co.uk/

Check the nutrition information on the various products.

I look for the lowest calories and the lowest net carbs.
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Old 05-25-2019, 12:48 PM   #4
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I like ryvita but I think home made crackers can be made with more fiber.



Quote:
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Another vote for Wasa!

Ryvita is another good product.

https://www.ryvita.co.uk/

Check the nutrition information on the various products.

I look for the lowest calories and the lowest net carbs.
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Old 06-03-2019, 02:59 PM   #5
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I tried making these in a pan. Nothing but dry flaky mush. Then I found some crackers with coconut flour in them, it added only 2 grams fiber. What a travesty industrialized food is.
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Old 06-03-2019, 03:59 PM   #6
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I don't use crackers that often. There are recipes on the web for quinoa crackers that get good reviews.
If you are using plant matter, it needs to dry out, so I used broccoli and cauliflower and then seasoning (and I think cooked rice as a binder), used the dehydrator and the oven. It was O-K, not great.
Here is the quinoa cracker recipe: https://thehiddenveggies.com/gluten-...-quinoa-vegan/
Also, invest in some parchment paper so things don't stick but they will brown.
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Old 06-03-2019, 04:13 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body canít digest, so you should subtract the grams of fiber from the total carbohydrate.
So I need a fiber counter or a carb counter that also subtracts fiber grams.
I don't know a lot about your main question, as diabetes isn't an issue for us, but I wanted to clarify that there are two types of fiber - soluble and insoluble - and they behave differently. Here's more detailed information: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319176.php
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Old 06-03-2019, 04:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
I like ryvita but I think home made crackers can be made with more fiber.
Why not just put fiber on the crackers? I doubt making them at home would make a significant difference in the amount of fiber you get.
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Old 06-03-2019, 06:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jawnn View Post
I like ryvita but I think home made crackers can be made with more fiber.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Why not just put fiber on the crackers? I doubt making them at home would make a significant difference in the amount of fiber you get.
Especially with Ryvita or Wasa. They are just whole grain and possibly whole seeds and a bit of salt. To get more fibre in a homemade "cracker", you would need to add straight fibre, which has no other nutrients and minimal flavour.
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Old 06-03-2019, 06:32 PM   #10
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Jawnn, I haven't made these but I've had really good luck with besan (chickpea flour aka garbanzo bean flour). The trick with it, is to let it sit after you add the liquid. It takes a while to soak up the moisture, then it does what you need.


It makes a good bread or 'omelette' with veg mixed in.



https://www.elephantasticvegan.com/g...kpea-crackers/


With this one as well, you'll need to work with something that doesn't stick to the dough and parchment does the trick.


If you are looking for a free app that calculates fiber/carbs/protein/fats/nutrients, the chronometer is a good one. You can add ground flax meal to your morning smoothie or oatmeal/fruits. It helps with fiber as well as bring balance to your omega 3 versus omega 6 fats. We use it here every day, 1 or 2 tablespoons.
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