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Old 09-28-2016, 12:40 PM   #41
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Rollbones, I did buy a bag and have grilled a couple of batches. They are OK, but still not an big as the fresh wings Costco used to have.
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Old 09-28-2016, 01:42 PM   #42
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Rollbones, I did buy a bag and have grilled a couple of batches. They are OK, but still not an big as the fresh wings Costco used to have.
Almost all chicken parts are smaller than they used to be. I think that's just because they don't let them grow as large - faster to slaughter means that they can start the next batch sooner for a faster return on the investment. It's just a guess, but I'm going with it.
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Old 09-28-2016, 02:02 PM   #43
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Almost all chicken parts are smaller than they used to be. I think that's just because they don't let them grow as large - faster to slaughter means that they can start the next batch sooner for a faster return on the investment. It's just a guess, but I'm going with it.
I don't see this at all. In our supermarket and others we visit from time to time, we never see small chickens. The boneless skinless chicken breasts are huge when compared to the norm from a few years ago. Had been looking for a small whole chicken, 3.5-4.0 pounds. The only way I could get one at our market was to buy a Bell and Evans which was much more expensive than the store brand.
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Old 09-28-2016, 05:28 PM   #44
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Almost all chicken parts are smaller than they used to be. I think that's just because they don't let them grow as large - faster to slaughter means that they can start the next batch sooner for a faster return on the investment. It's just a guess, but I'm going with it.

RP current chickens are really genetic monstrosities, bread for small limbs and enormous breasts as most people cook chicken breasts and don't want to be bothered with a whole chicken, or drums and thighs.

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Old 10-08-2016, 06:31 PM   #45
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Went to vegas for a week and wow this thread blew up haha

erehweslefox, on the buyers guide I wrote I give some tips on how you can save some money on bags. I show methods of using ziplock bags, even. I'm in the process of developing a tool to use that will allow you to seal flat bags easily, as well.

I also acknowledge that it is sorta crazy how much the bags cost, so I started a discount club for purchasing bags and rolls. It's sort of a strength in numbers thing where I will use the membership to demand lower prices for everyone. I've got some vendors interested and am preparing to arrange a sale on consumables soon. You can sign up here

I will say that sealing food and other supplies during hikes and camping has made a huge difference for me. I also make sure to plan that my ice melts into water that I can later use, but have had both my meal and my water ruined before :( I've been caught in a storm but was lucky enough to seal my matches and fire starting stuff and was able to start a fire despite the wood being wet.
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Old 10-09-2016, 12:04 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Rollbones, I did buy a bag and have grilled a couple of batches. They are OK, but still not an big as the fresh wings Costco used to have.
Weird. The fresh wings were tiny in comparison to the frozen wings in our store. Are you buying the Kirkland frozen sections?
I just made a batch for the game last night and was asked where I found such jumbo wing sections.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Almost all chicken parts are smaller than they used to be. I think that's just because they don't let them grow as large - faster to slaughter means that they can start the next batch sooner for a faster return on the investment. It's just a guess, but I'm going with it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I don't see this at all. In our supermarket and others we visit from time to time, we never see small chickens. The boneless skinless chicken breasts are huge when compared to the norm from a few years ago. Had been looking for a small whole chicken, 3.5-4.0 pounds. The only way I could get one at our market was to buy a Bell and Evans which was much more expensive than the store brand.
I agree. Chickens and chicken parts are huge as compared to years past. Wing sections however are small in general from my personal experience. Costco is where I get the wing sections as they are much bigger.
Last week our local grocery store had whole chickens and legs and thighs on sale. The smallest whole chicken I could find was 6 pounds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartCooks View Post
Went to vegas for a week and wow this thread blew up haha

erehweslefox, on the buyers guide I wrote I give some tips on how you can save some money on bags. I show methods of using ziplock bags, even. I'm in the process of developing a tool to use that will allow you to seal flat bags easily, as well.

I also acknowledge that it is sorta crazy how much the bags cost, so I started a discount club for purchasing bags and rolls. It's sort of a strength in numbers thing where I will use the membership to demand lower prices for everyone. I've got some vendors interested and am preparing to arrange a sale on consumables soon. You can sign up here
Good luck. Amazon and other web sites sell vacuum bags for excellent prices.
I saw a two roll set. 11.5 x 50 (2) for under $15.
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Old 10-09-2016, 12:31 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Weird. The fresh wings were tiny in comparison to the frozen wings in our store. Are you buying the Kirkland frozen sections?
I just made a batch for the game last night and was asked where I found such jumbo wing sections...
Yes, a huge zippered plastic bag of wing sections (maybe 10 Lb.). Before Costco changed their chicken supplier, they sold fresh wings in vacuum packed six packs. Those wings were consistently bigger. I had switched from the frozen Kirkland wings to those fresh vacuum packed ones because I felt they were bigger and better. The wings were whole and you hand to cut them apart but it was worth it.

Now the fresh vac-pacs have cut up sections and are smaller.

At least here in MA/NH I cannot get the bigger wings. I've been using the frozen ones.
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Old 10-14-2016, 06:37 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartCooks View Post
Went to vegas for a week and wow this thread blew up haha

erehweslefox, on the buyers guide I wrote I give some tips on how you can save some money on bags. I show methods of using ziplock bags, even. I'm in the process of developing a tool to use that will allow you to seal flat bags easily, as well.

I also acknowledge that it is sorta crazy how much the bags cost, so I started a discount club for purchasing bags and rolls. It's sort of a strength in numbers thing where I will use the membership to demand lower prices for everyone. I've got some vendors interested and am preparing to arrange a sale on consumables soon. You can sign up here

I will say that sealing food and other supplies during hikes and camping has made a huge difference for me. I also make sure to plan that my ice melts into water that I can later use, but have had both my meal and my water ruined before :( I've been caught in a storm but was lucky enough to seal my matches and fire starting stuff and was able to start a fire despite the wood being wet.
Signed up, I am looking to buy a sealer rig both for my home kitchen and backpacking. And, yeah, I've had my food and water both ruined by leaky bags on a hike. I tend to carry both hexamine tabs and a sqeeze bottle of kerosene for those 'lighting a fire in wet conditions' moments. And we have a MSR Dragonfly multifuel stove, which can burn darn near anything.

TBS
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:00 PM   #49
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I have a sealer from the early 70's, so I guess that makes it going on 45 years old.

There is a crack in the rubber vacuum nozzle, the button to activate the heat is broken, I use a bent paper clip, and the heat wires at the very ends don't seem to get hot enough to always seal the plastics.

Also admit it doesn't always get all the air out but enough that I'm comfortable with freezing stuff if used within a reasonable time. Most often used to reseal bags that don't need the air pulled out.

I love it and seeing the prices of the new ones am striving to keeping it as long as I can! LOL I think I paid less than 30$ for it.

Excellent article thou - Thanks!
From what I understand, some of the vintage 70s sealers have become valuable and sought after. The early, nozzle-type FoodSavers were made in Italy and supposedly are real tanks.

I envy you! Would love to get my hands on one. Take good care of it!
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:01 PM   #50
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I love my sealer too. Don't know how I ever got along without one.
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