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Old 01-22-2008, 07:20 AM   #11
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The human body needs about 2 tablespoons of fat a day to keep all cellular functions operating happily.
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Old 01-22-2008, 08:52 AM   #12
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we need them for a variety of Hormones too, compare coleSTEROL with progeSTEROne or testoSTEROne.

they are all fats and some are fatty acids, Stearates are the salts of these acids, ever heard of Sodium Strearate? how about if I say Soap!

they really are an amazing group of Molecule types :)
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Old 01-22-2008, 11:09 AM   #13
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My husband has been diagnosed with COPD (early stages), and it's recommended that he maintain a high fat/low carb diet. With COPD, one's lungs calcify, i.e., harden up, and the fat helps keep the air sacs in the lungs lubricated.
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Old 01-22-2008, 12:25 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
I tend to agree. I worry less about the chemical ingredients in the food and more about what chemicals might be on the food.

But, I also shy away from heavily processed foods to begin with and I am sure that helps. To me avoiding processed foods is second nature to loving to cook. I am having a hard time articulating this, but I think I am try to say "If we are into cooking, then why would we be buying alot of pre-packaged and pre-processed food instead of fresh ingredients and making it ourselves?"
Not sure if I made any sence there, but if I make my own sauces, dressings, soups, etc. then I guess i dont have much to worry about concerning emulsifiers, dyes, artifical flavorings etc. since I just dont use them in my own cooking.

Nothing beats homecooked!
I couldn't agree with you more. I too am an avid cook and I cook everything I eat. I don't use processed foods unless I absolutely have to. I do use butter, never margarine and never canola oil. ACCCCKKKK. Olive oil and corn oil are staples in my house but olive oil is used for most things including my own salad dressings, sauces, soups, etc. just like you do. You can't buy soup or salad dressing that can equal the purity of ingredients or the taste of homemade and the salad dressings only take a few minutes to make.
I make my own bread crumbs too, how easy is that? Ever look on the side panel of can of bread crumbs? Why do bread crumbs need 30 other ingredients? Most of those things are fillers, like cellulose. More AAACCCKKK.

Everything in moderation. Paula Deen and Emeril Lagasse take note.
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Old 01-22-2008, 12:40 PM   #15
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DramaQueen, what is wrong with canola in your opinion? And why is corn oil better? In Canada we get lots of information about canola and its all good. It is nearly free of saturated fat and is almost 60% monounsaturated and has essential omega 3's. I'm not all that familiar with corn oil, but I'm off to do a search on its contents.

Edit: found this on corn oil
"Refined corn oil is 99% triglyceride, with proportions of approximately 59% polyunsaturated fatty acid, 24% monounsaturated fatty acid, and 13% saturated fatty acid."
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:07 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Alix View Post
DramaQueen, what is wrong with canola in your opinion? And why is corn oil better? In Canada we get lots of information about canola and its all good. It is nearly free of saturated fat and is almost 60% monounsaturated and has essential omega 3's. I'm not all that familiar with corn oil, but I'm off to do a search on its contents.

Edit: found this on corn oil "Refined corn oil is 99% triglyceride, with proportions of approximately 59% polyunsaturated fatty acid, 24% monounsaturated fatty acid, and 13% saturated fatty acid."
Alix, this is one of many, many articles and TV health segments on Canola oil. It's a long article, and I didn't write it so please don't kill the messenger.

I truly have never read anything that praises the virtues of canola oil. I prefer not to use it, I don't like what I've learned about it, but but along with that, it has no flavor and I find it a waste of money. Here is the article:


But let's start with what canola oil is. "Canola" is not a plant. Canola is a made up word for "Canada" and "oil". Canola oil is actually derived from the rapeseed plant. Obviously the food industry didn't think that RAPE was a good word to market their new oil, so they coined the name "Canola" and that's what we call it.

Until the 1970s, rapeseed was not fit for human consumption because it was too high in eruric acid. Eruric acid has been shown to cause heart lesions and vitamin E deficiency. This acid, though, made it the perfect lubricant for engines and it was used industrially. During World War II it's production skyrocketed. But after the war, the need for rapeseed oil plummeted and the food industry set about trying to figure out how to keep this big cash crop going.

They kept cross-breeding the rapeseed until they got the eruric acid level low enough to get the FDA to consider it GRAS (generally regarded as safe) seal of approval. The level "considered" safe is 2 percent or below. Most canola oil has anywhere from .5-1 percent eruric acid still in it. Is that safe? Hopefully. But when it's heated, even low levels of eruric acid have been linked to lung cancer. You should never heat canola oil.

But is that reason enough to not use it? Probably not. That was the big deal in the email hoax - the eruric acid.

Consider the FDA will not allow canola oil in infant formula because it was found to retard growth, according to the Federal Register in 1985. Do I need to make my children midgets?

And here is something that cannot be denied. Eighty percent of the rapeseed crop being planted now is genetically engineered to resist an herbicide called glufosinate ammonium. This herbicide is non-selective and will kill any plant it comes into contact with - unless the plant has been genetically altered to keep it from dying. This means you can dump as much herbicide as you want on the weeds and no longer worry about killing your actual crop. Glufosinate ammonium has been linked to nervous system problems in humans and animals. The FDA says even small amounts of this herbicide are toxic and no one is regulating the rapeseed oil for this residue.

This is big business for the companies that produce herbicides though. Big business!

These genetically altered plants are also posing another risk by crossbreeding with weeds and making the weeds resistant to glufosinate ammonium. Now you need to add a different herbicide in to kill the GA-resistant weeds. Guess what? This means more herbicides are being sold! Somebody is making even more money!

Honeybees are the biggest pollinators of rapeseed. Given the choice, honeybees will choose the rapeseed flower over other flowers. In 1997, the New Scientist published a report showing that proteins from the genetically engineered rapeseed are showing up in honey and may have adverse effects on bees and cause unknown allergens in humans.

Okay, so who cares about bees? Is that reason enough to stop eating canola?

Well then, let's also consider the fact rapeseed is a stinky oil. The reason no one but a few Asian cultures used it for food is that it has a stinky pungent odor. It's also a naturally dark oil. Look at your bottle of canola oil. Is it dark? In order to get the stink out and change it's color, it has to be deodorized and bleached. This process involves heating it and using chemicals. Guess what happens to the Omega 3s when they are heated? They become rancid. I could have linked the whole chemical process, but you would seriously need to be a chemist to get it. Do I need to be a chemist to know what I'm eating?

Okay, so if that isn't enough to convince you, also consider that in addition to being highly refined, heated, and bleached, solvents like hexane and acetone are also used in the process of extracting the oil from the seeds and preventing the crystallization of the rapeseed sediment.

So let's go over this. Canola oil contains potentially dangerous eruric acid, along with residues from herbicides, solvents, and bleaches. It's genetically altered. It's having an impact on the environment and on animal species.

Will it kill you? Probably not. Is is the best choice?

NO!

Your best choice is to use cold-pressed oils. They cost a lot. I use cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil. I prefer Greek. I also use high oleic, cold-pressed organic safflower oil. I sometimes use grape seed oil. We use butter. Do NOT use margarine ever. Do not eat hydrogenated anything.


If you want to do one single thing to change your health, your cardiovascular health and your cholesterol, change your oil.

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Old 01-22-2008, 03:23 PM   #17
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I consider this a classic example of propaganda from other oil producers.

They make non-specific statements that suggest but do not prove certain things and leave it up to the uneducated consumers' ignorance of the facts to fear the worst. It's very easy to trigger the, "I'm not going to use that stuff just to be on the safe side." response in people.
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:38 PM   #18
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the oil I use the most of is olive oil, followed by canola oil. Real corn oil is great, but not easily found, at least not where i live. It should be a dark yellow. It is wonderful in corn bread.

Is this still the fat thread? If it is,

some vitamins are water soluble ( B vit, and C) and some are fat soluble (A, D, E, K). We need that little bit of fat in our diet every day to help transport the fat soluble vitamins around our body.
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:38 PM   #19
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DramaQueen, I can see why you would be worried if that is the only information you have about it. Forgive me, but that article is a load of horse puckies. I will refute a few comments in that article. Thanks for sharing that so I could understand your strong comments earlier. I appreciate that. And don't worry, not shooting the messenger here.

Canola is so named because it is Canadian Oil, Low Acid. It is indeed modified rapeseed oil which was high in erucic acid...canola is not. And it is very low indeed, far below what is cited in that article
"Canola oil contains only 0.5 to 1% erucic acid, well below the 2 percent limit set by the USDA."

I guess this reinforces my original statement that there is a lot of information out there and it pays to do some research.

I'm going to continue to use canola oil in the places where I don't use olive oil. And DramaQueen, we will just have to agree to disagree because from what I read, corn oil has the kinds of fats that I'm working on eliminating. (triglycerides and saturated fats).
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:41 PM   #20
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I use canola in higher heat applications as it has a higher smoke point than EVOO.
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