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Old 09-06-2007, 04:09 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
IC, what would one do with this "caviar"? Is it just for fun like your friend's Seuss special (good enough for me) or are there actual meals people serve this with? You mentioned other liquids could be used. Would this be like a garnish? Would they ever be dissolved in hot liquid?
Your ignorant pal,
Terry (lol)
Yeah, they'll dissolve with heat. Usually, it's used as a cool way to add a flavor component to a dish. For example, I did it once with ponzu sauce for a tuna tartare special, so as the guest was eating the tuna, the little ponzu "caviars" would burst in their mouths and the flavor would come through. Marcel from Top Chef made coffee caviar and served it with blinis and creme fraiche. Basically, think of it like a sauce or flavoring component. Another example would be making raspberry or chocolate caviar, and then serving it with vanilla ice cream.

Here's a couple of examples. The first picture has caviar that looks like salmon roe. It's actually caviar made with a dilluted Sriracha mixture. The second picture has an espresso caviar used for a tiramisu.



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Old 09-06-2007, 04:31 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by ironchef View Post
Yeah, they'll dissolve with heat. Usually, it's used as a cool way to add a flavor component to a dish. For example, I did it once with ponzu sauce for a tuna tartare special, so as the guest was eating the tuna, the little ponzu "caviars" would burst in their mouths and the flavor would come through. Marcel from Top Chef made coffee caviar and served it with blinis and creme fraiche. Basically, think of it like a sauce or flavoring component. Another example would be making raspberry or chocolate caviar, and then serving it with vanilla ice cream.

Here's a couple of examples. The first picture has caviar that looks like salmon roe. It's actually caviar made with a dilluted Sriracha mixture. The second picture has an espresso caviar used for a tiramisu.
OK, this makes sense now. I love the Sriracha caviar! We go through a lot of Sriracha here - my sons like it with almost everything. And how elegant to serve a fruit or chocolate flavored caviar with a simple dish of ice cream. Your pics are gorgeous and I can't wait to play with this. Thanks.
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Old 09-06-2007, 11:25 PM   #13
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I'm really fascinated by them, and I think they'd make a really unique way to sauce a composed dish. My big issue right now is how thick the alginated liquid gets, i find it somewhat too viscous, and if I can make the spheres with a thinner liquid I plan on encapsulating all sorts of things in these spheres.
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Old 09-06-2007, 11:29 PM   #14
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I'm really fascinated by them, and I think they'd make a really unique way to sauce a composed dish. My big issue right now is how thick the alginated liquid gets, i find it somewhat too viscous, and if I can make the spheres with a thinner liquid I plan on encapsulating all sorts of things in these spheres.
Yes, please do College Cook. And make sure you post your results and more pics. I am going to be playing with this for a while because it's just neat!
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Old 05-27-2008, 09:55 AM   #15
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question

My qustion is how I can stop [FONT='Tahoma','sans-serif']consolidation process. I mean then get the little caviar balls I can blow it up(liquid inside).[/FONT]
[FONT='Tahoma','sans-serif']After some time liquid become to be jelly. May be you know how I can stop this chemical process.(if it possible)[/FONT]

[FONT='Tahoma','sans-serif']Best regards and thanks in advance[/FONT]
[FONT='Tahoma','sans-serif']Maxim[/FONT]
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Old 01-26-2009, 01:38 PM   #16
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Wouldn't this be great in a drink!! Glass of sprite with fruit juice balls. Dish of ice cream, poke the balls and instant topping. Maybe even salad dressing or veggie sauces. Oh my mind is a reeling...........................
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