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Old 10-13-2014, 10:45 AM   #21
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When adding mire poix or trinity veggies to a hot pot, I add them all at once. Garlic comes later to prevent burning. The point is to extract flavor from these veggies, not to do a perfect sauté. You want the veggies to soften and brown around the edges for most western dishes. These veggies end up getting cooked thoroughly in the pot with everything else.
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Old 10-14-2014, 12:01 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
I was watching a Youtube video the other day and one particular chef said when adding vegetables to a pot or pan to saute always hold off and add the celery after. The reason being that celery is comprised of so much water that it renders too much of it and will prevent the other vegetables, like carrots, onions, and garlic from caramelizing. So many recipes, weather they be European, North American, Latin American, start with these standard vegetables and techniques but yet I have never heard of this cooking tip. What's really funny is that it makes perfectly good sense....

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It only matters if you're planning to caramelize your mirepois. Many recipes only call for sauteing to a point of translucency, and in that case it wouldn't matter. I've made recipes which specifically call for sweating the veggies, not sauteing.
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Old 10-14-2014, 12:04 AM   #23
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yup, sort of my point earlier.

but gg was right; it was specifically mentioned for caramelization.
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Old 10-14-2014, 12:07 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
A friend who is married into a family from India recently shared this with me: "Indian meals often take a lot longer to prep than western meals. What looks like a simple curry can have up to 18 ingredients. What westerners don't know is that it is often cooked one day and eaten the next at room temperature." My least favourite dishes to make for the photoshoots are Indian. They use far more mise-en-place dishes and require more prep than other dishes. But, I love the end result, just not dealing with all those little dishes.

but, but, what about servsafe? everyone in india must get food poisoning a lot if they eat room temp food cooked the day before. room temp takes longer to achieve from cold than from hot.

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Old 10-14-2014, 12:55 AM   #25
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I assume they refrigerate it and then let it sit out for 1/2 an hour. I'll have to ask her when she gets back from holidays.
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Old 10-14-2014, 01:13 AM   #26
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lol, yeah, the appliance industry is huge in india.

Poverty in India - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

and somehow they survive on day old, room temp food.
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Old 10-14-2014, 07:57 AM   #27
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That's where dysentery comes from. Interestingly, dysentery can also cause lactose intolerance, which may explain the Indian aversion to cow's milk.
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Old 10-14-2014, 10:29 AM   #28
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i'm only goofing around.

but yeah, that is interesting.
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