"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-30-2017, 01:54 PM   #21
Master Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 5,253
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwasifar View Post
I'll go season it as di reston advises. It's just been basically resurfaced, so I have to treat it like a brand new pan now.

Thanks all!
If the wet sanding left swirl marks, try some Meguair's #7 car polish on it before you season it. That should get most, if not all of the swirl marks out.

CD
__________________

__________________
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” Winnie-the-Pooh
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2017, 03:27 PM   #22
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 5
So my wife used that Botticelli olive oil to grease a pan for oven use, and wound up with the same problem there. Then she pan-seared something else, using canola oil instead of olive oil, and had no problems. So I'm guessing the Botticelli is just not suitable for the use we're trying to put it to.

All this does make me think the mass market brands we've been using contain something besides EVOO.
__________________

dwasifar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2017, 09:14 AM   #23
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 547
EVOO is not recommended for saute/frying/deep fry anyway.
it's expensive, the compounds that make it expensive go away very quickly when heated.

the smoke point of canola oil is higher than EVOO - there's no surprise that it burned on.

try peanut oil or safflower oil - they withstand significantly higher temps.
dcSaute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2017, 09:28 AM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 10,823
I use canola, peanut, coconut, avocado or grape seed oils for high heat cooking/sautéing. EVOO, kalamata oil and flaxseed oil for finishing/dressings. I also use sesame oil and hot chili sesame oils for marinade, fillings, dressings and added to other oils to quick stir fry. And to add a splash of flavor to finished foods like rice and soups.
__________________
There is freedom within, there is freedom without
Try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
There's a battle ahead, many battles are lost
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2017, 09:47 AM   #25
Executive Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,840
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwasifar View Post
So my wife used that Botticelli olive oil to grease a pan for oven use, and wound up with the same problem there. Then she pan-seared something else, using canola oil instead of olive oil, and had no problems. So I'm guessing the Botticelli is just not suitable for the use we're trying to put it to.

All this does make me think the mass market brands we've been using contain something besides EVOO.
EVOO is not recommended as a frying oil. Filtered olive oil is okay, not much different from any other, but EVOO still has a lot of solids that haven't been filtered out, and those can burn. I use both types of olive oil, and pale amber colored oils with no sediments seem just fine for general cooking.

What I have right now is a jug of Walmart's Great Value brand. Ingredient on the label just says olive oil, product of Italy, Spain, Greece, and Tunisia. It's yellowish in color and doesn't have a heavy olive flavor. I also have several bottles of various flavor infused EVOO's from a specialty shop. The latter are far more expensive, and used primarily as finishing oils by adding late them in the cooking process to give flavor without damaging the oils by overheating them.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2017, 09:58 AM   #26
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 45,283
Olive oil has a lower smoke point than the other oils you mentioned. As a result, when OO is heated in the pan, it vaporizes and settles on the inside edges of the pan and burns on creating a brownish coating.

Oils like canola, corn, peanut, safflower, etc. have higher smoke points so the vaporization does not occur as easily, resulting in cleaner pans.

For that reason, I don't use OO for higher heat applications. Besides, if you're cooking a piece of chicken or steak, etc, you won't really taste the difference in the oil used.

So I'd say your oil isn't fake. It's doing what OO is supposed to do.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2017, 09:59 AM   #27
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
EVOO is not recommended as a frying oil. Filtered olive oil is okay, not much different from any other, but EVOO still has a lot of solids that haven't been filtered out, and those can burn. I use both types of olive oil, and pale amber colored oils with no sediments seem just fine for general cooking.
To call it a "frying oil" in this case is kind of overstating things. All she was doing was a quick pan-sear of a pork loin before broiling it, with just a little oil to keep it from sticking to the pan. She tried canola oil the most recent time because that was what we had handy.

I'll get some peanut oil for this.
dwasifar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2017, 03:20 PM   #28
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California's Big Valley
Posts: 831
In nearly 60 years of cooking I've never had any kind of good luck searing anything in a stainless steel frying pan. There's always a brown/burnt residue left. I have better luck with cast iron. I don't think the problem is the olive oil in your situation. I should note here that I do cook on a Wolf stove so it give me a great sear.
__________________

Oldvine is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
oil, olive oil

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.