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Old 03-20-2014, 12:54 PM   #1
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Facebook Potato

I ran across this idea on Facebook the other day. I tried making them and they were very good.

Preheat oven to 400F
Wash potato but do not remove the skin.
Slice potato but do not slice all the way through. (See Photo)
Brush with olive oil or melted butter.
Sprinkle with coarse salt and cracked pepper.

Bake for one hour or until slices are crispy at the edges and golden brown.

I have made these twice now and have a suggestion to the original recipe.
Put something into/between each slice to allow the potato to open like a flower.
Or put something under each potato to allow it to bend in the middle and open it up.
I am thinking a small piece of onion might work in between the slices? Pat of butter? Garlic? Something to keep them separated.

I am looking for suggestions for how to help the potato flower. Like a blooming onion.
I tried soaking in cold salted water, but did not have time to allow it to blossom. Not sure that would have worked anyway.
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Old 03-20-2014, 12:57 PM   #2
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They're also known as hasselback potatoes.
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Old 03-20-2014, 01:03 PM   #3
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ATK had a recipe for hasselback potatoes that involved rinsing the potatoes after slicing to get rid of some of the excess starch. There's more to their process. You can look it up on their site. I made them once and tossed the recipe because I think it's too fussy for no real benefit other than it's a novelty.
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Old 03-20-2014, 01:23 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
ATK had a recipe for hasselback potatoes that involved rinsing the potatoes after slicing to get rid of some of the excess starch. There's more to their process. You can look it up on their site. I made them once and tossed the recipe because I think it's too fussy for no real benefit other than it's a novelty.
The first time I saw this on ATK, my immediate thought was "a company recipe." A potato is a potato and tastes like a potato should.
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Old 03-20-2014, 01:46 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I ran across this idea on Facebook the other day. I tried making them and they were very good.

Preheat oven to 400F
Wash potato but do not remove the skin.
Slice potato but do not slice all the way through. (See Photo)
Brush with olive oil or melted butter.
Sprinkle with coarse salt and cracked pepper.

Bake for one hour or until slices are crispy at the edges and golden brown.

I have made these twice now and have a suggestion to the original recipe.
Put something into/between each slice to allow the potato to open like a flower.
Or put something under each potato to allow it to bend in the middle and open it up.
I am thinking a small piece of onion might work in between the slices? Pat of butter? Garlic? Something to keep them separated.

I am looking for suggestions for how to help the potato flower. Like a blooming onion.
I tried soaking in cold salted water, but did not have time to allow it to blossom. Not sure that would have worked anyway.
Since a potato isn't round and it's cut from end to end, it won't open like a flower. A blooming onion is cut in concentric circles to make it open like a flower.

I've been making these for years. I like to put some grated Parmesan cheese and fresh herbs - what I use depends on what's in other dishes in the meal - in the slices.

Here's a tip: Put a pair of chopsticks under the potato, down the length, as you make the slices. They will prevent you from slicing all the way through.
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Old 03-20-2014, 02:38 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Since a potato isn't round and it's cut from end to end, it won't open like a flower. A blooming onion is cut in concentric circles to make it open like a flower.

I've been making these for years. I like to put some grated Parmesan cheese and fresh herbs - what I use depends on what's in other dishes in the meal - in the slices.

Here's a tip: Put a pair of chopsticks under the potato, down the length, as you make the slices. They will prevent you from slicing all the way through.
Bloomin onion was only an example. I had hoped cold salted water would help to separate the slices?

Great suggestion on the chop sticks as I had to be very careful not to go all the way through. And getting almost there is a requirement.

For those who look at this as a gimmick.
They come out fairly crispy and can be pulled apart slice by slice and dipped into anything you like including ketchup for the kids (my wife too).

It is much more flavorful than a standard baked potato, with little more work.
GG. Does the grated cheese help to keep the slices separated? I saw some other pictures of potato's like this with all kinds of things in between the slices. So far I have only used butter, oil salt and pepper.

I am going to try putting a small piece of onion in between to help separate the slices next time. Or maybe kick them up with other inserts.
Thanks for the help.

Oh. I had another idea. Once they are sliced and ready, what do you think about deep frying the whole thing? I bet that would open up things a little? Might even add some crunch?
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Old 03-20-2014, 04:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Bloomin onion was only an example. I had hoped cold salted water would help to separate the slices?
I'm not sure. I don't think that would soften them enough to allow the bottom to bend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
GG. Does the grated cheese help to keep the slices separated? I saw some other pictures of potato's like this with all kinds of things in between the slices. So far I have only used butter, oil salt and pepper.
No, it adds flavor. I think the problem with your idea is that there isn't a lot of room for the slices to expand into. As you try to open them up, the ends will press against the surface. If you cut off a few slices at each end, that might help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I am going to try putting a small piece of onion in between to help separate the slices next time. Or maybe kick them up with other inserts.
Thanks for the help.
It's worth a shot

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Oh. I had another idea. Once they are sliced and ready, what do you think about deep frying the whole thing? I bet that would open up things a little? Might even add some crunch?
For this, I think I would cut the potatoes differently. Instead of cutting them almost all the way through, I'd cut them halfway through, alternating cuts on the top and bottom. I think they would be less likely to come apart in the fryer with shallower cuts.

I don't deep-fry at home, but I would guess that dredging them in some seasoned flour or a light batter would help with crisping them up.
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Old 03-20-2014, 05:31 PM   #8
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I've made these several times, and yes, the bamboo shoved lengthwise through the very bottom keeps you from cutting all the way through.

For flavor, try using a pepper oil, or herb/spice mixture. Truffle oil or truffle salt is good, as is a good compound butter.

Another good flavor profile with these is EVOO and garlic. I think, if the Hassleback potatoes were supported with something like a slotted spoon, or wire basket, you could get deep fry them. The problem would be removing them from the oil. These are also great when brushed with a liquid fat, be it butter, or bacon grease, and grilled between divided banks of charcoal.

If you haven't tried them, this - http://www.13wmaz.com/news/article/194546/0/Bacon-Wrapped-Sausage-Stuffed-Potato-Bombs .

I cored my stuffed potato bombs all the way through, and cut the plug in half. I stuffed the spuds with mushrooms and butter, cut the plug in half, and inserted the two halves part way in on either side. I didn't wrap in in foil, but rather placed them on a cooler part of the grill while cooking a large chicken. The smoke from the grill added a wonderful flavor to my potato bombs.

And yet another technique for everyone to enjoy. I didn't invent it. But I do enjoy it.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-21-2014, 11:37 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I've made these several times, and yes, the bamboo shoved lengthwise through the very bottom keeps you from cutting all the way through.
Thanks Chief. I think GG's point was to use two(2) chop sticks along the outside bottom to prevent cutting all the way through.
I did not hear her say to insert the chop stick.

However, if you are using a bamboo skewer, then shoving it would work.
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Old 03-21-2014, 11:55 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Thanks Chief. I think GG's point was to use two(2) chop sticks along the outside bottom to prevent cutting all the way through.
I did not hear her say to insert the chop stick.

However, if you are using a bamboo skewer, then shoving it would work.
Yes, the recipe I used called for bamboo skewers shoved through the potato. It worked well for me.

I think you're right about GG's post though. It sounds like it would work too.

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