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Old 01-03-2009, 06:12 PM   #141
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Did anyone say crowder peas? or buttermilk biscuits?
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Old 01-03-2009, 06:28 PM   #142
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1 2 3 Cake
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Old 01-03-2009, 06:31 PM   #143
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shrimp & grits
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Old 01-03-2009, 06:44 PM   #144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leolady View Post
Okra's origins are african, so are yams. Does that make them less southern?
The orange-fleshed sweet potato, erroneously referred to as a "yam" in many parts of the US, is native to South America. The true yam is almost unknown in the US. Several varieties are widely cultivated and eaten in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Carribean.

Cecil Adams explains the confusion in his unique style: The Straight Dope: What's the difference between yams and sweet potatoes?
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Old 01-03-2009, 06:44 PM   #145
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Originally Posted by ImNotReallyaWaitress View Post
Y'all are making me hungry!!
How does one make grits exactly?
Add moisture back to ground hominy, either on the stove or in the nuker. Quick grits arent the best, but all that i can find in the store in friggin Illinois. Dont matter how ya do it as long as it has bacon grease/butter, salt pepper and cheese of some sort by the time that it is done.

I cant believe that no one has said fatback yet!
Fried fatback and fried mush with hot buttermilk biscuits is about the best breakfast in the world
Oh yeah...pickled okra too
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Old 01-03-2009, 07:06 PM   #146
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I tried, but I still can't get into eating grits! Yuck, I have to stick with my steel cut oats on that one.
But the others, yea I think I should have been born southern as well cause I love em all!! Now if I can just remember what that dish they did on Throwdown last summer is.... Brown Susan or something like that?? Made with bread covered with slices of turkey, tomatoes (I think), bacon, and a white gravy...
Anybody?? UB?? I think they said it was a regional dish from Kentucky... Katie?
It was Bobby against two Vietnamese brothers from Kentucky, twins.
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Old 01-03-2009, 07:26 PM   #147
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I tried, but I still can't get into eating grits! Yuck, I have to stick with my steel cut oats on that one.
But the others, yea I think I should have been born southern as well cause I love em all!! Now if I can just remember what that dish they did on Throwdown last summer is.... Brown Susan or something like that?? Made with bread covered with slices of turkey, tomatoes (I think), bacon, and a white gravy...
Anybody?? UB?? I think they said it was a regional dish from Kentucky... Katie?
It was Bobby against two Vietnamese brothers from Kentucky, twins.
The sandwich is called a Kentucky Hot Brown, named after the Brown Hotel in Louisville, KY, where is was first served (and where Bobby Flay had his throwdown, which he lost).

Traditionally, the sauce is a mornay sauce (bechamel with grated swiss and parmesan cheeses added), but often served instead with cheddar cheese sauce.

It's a great sandwich.
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Old 01-03-2009, 07:54 PM   #148
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Canned hot peppers (chilies or jalepenos) with small green tomatoes. Perfect for butter beans, any kind of greens and black eyed peas.

Oh yeah creamed corn. Although not necessarily Southern, definitely a staple on the Sunday table.

Couple of more:
Blackened catfish
Fried catfish
Chicken fried steak
Chicken fried chicken
Pickled okra (very good in bloody mary's)
Pickled green beans (read above)
Sawmill gravy
Cathead biscuits
Turnip greens
Collard greens
Dreamland BBQ ribs (Tuscaloosa AL - only thing good there)
Tomatoes, corn and okra - um,um good
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Old 01-03-2009, 07:54 PM   #149
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Yup that's it! Thanks!
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Old 01-03-2009, 08:06 PM   #150
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FincaPerlitas View Post
The orange-fleshed sweet potato, erroneously referred to as a "yam" in many parts of the US, is native to South America. The true yam is almost unknown in the US. Several varieties are widely cultivated and eaten in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Carribean.

Cecil Adams explains the confusion in his unique style: The Straight Dope: What's the difference between yams and sweet potatoes?
So in other words, african slaves took what they found here that was close to what they already were using in africa. Close enough in my book!
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