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Old 02-19-2012, 10:44 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Thanks. I think I will pick up a bottle next time I go shopping. Will let you know. Fortunately, I am not allergic to nuts of any kind. Just the two legged ones.
IMHO I think that grapeseed oil is ideal for any deepfry application, it is flavorless and has a very high smoke point. I always have a bottle in the cupboard and although I don't deepfry often, it is great for everyday use.

Two thumbs up.
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Old 02-28-2012, 07:16 PM   #42
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Thanks everyone, i think the burning was because of the corn meal/bread crumbs mixed in with the flower.
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Old 02-29-2012, 01:49 AM   #43
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You know DC will always beat a topic to death--because we all love to discuss cooking--you know like in the site name--so if anybody asks a question and there's 100 replies then there's bound to be one that has the correct answer.

Question is, which one?
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Old 03-06-2012, 10:08 PM   #44
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for frying anything, i use corn FLOUR --- it produces a superior crust. i fry ONLY in 100% peanut oil. if heated to the proper temperature (usually about 370 is when i add food, which lowers it to about 350-360 for frying) the sear is so quick and hot that the food is not greasy at all. i just finished a batch of 4 dozen eggrolls deep fried in peanut oil and did not have to add ANY oil at all. drained well and stored in the freezer, i reheat in the toaster oven to bake. they are super crisp and crunchy with no greasiness at all.

when making chicken or scallops, i might make a mixture of duke's mayonnaise (a much better blended egg, basically) thinned with a little milk or cream. i would dip the scallops/chicken in corn flour, then the mayo/milk, then the flour again and into the hot peanut oil. it's a no-fail formula for goodness, even with leftovers (which is really hard to do with fried food of any kind).

the peanut oil has a much higher flash point and can take the very high heat needed to make the sear and keep the food from absorbing grease. the corn flour makes a huge difference. corn meal is too coarse and grainy and burns easily, and wheat flour is too gummy. the coating is very thin, crisp and the meats seared so still juicy and tender (easy to overcook small things in a hot fryer).

hope this helps ...
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Old 03-06-2012, 10:35 PM   #45
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It's an interesting suggestion to use mayonnaise as the interface between the food being cooked and the breading medium. I'll be interested in exploring this concept.
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:17 PM   #46
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the thinned mayonnaise acts as a very fine, uniform egg coating (must be real mayo to work) --- the milk or cream should be just enough for the wetness to run off, leaving minimal coating. you can test with a spoon.

this combination with corn flour creates a very light, crisp but perfect seal to keep the chicken/fish totally away from the oil.

i'd be interested to know what you think.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:02 PM   #47
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I'd be interested in how a mixture of honey and mustard would perform in frying (to hold on the breading). I sometimes use that in oven "fried" chicken recipes.
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:01 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
I'd be interested in how a mixture of honey and mustard would perform in frying (to hold on the breading). I sometimes use that in oven "fried" chicken recipes.

there are no adhesion properties to either.

The reason mayo works, is because of the egg. Just like during war time, when fresh eggs where scarce, and hard to come by, Mayonnaise cakes became the "thing", mayo is eggs and oil, and to be honest, some of the most moist cakes I have ever had the pleasure of trying(when putting Mayo as a mystery ingredient in pastry chefs mystery box) were because of the mayo.

Mustard, and honey have no adhesion, you would end up with a bunch of (pretty tasty) batter flakes, all fried up golden, while your bird would be more naked than breaded.
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:06 AM   #49
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there are no adhesion properties to either.
Maybe not in oil but try dipping your chicken pieces in a honey and mustard mixture, then Shake 'n Bake, then into the oven per package directions. It tastes pretty good and is a nice change from "stock" Shake 'n Bake chicken. I'm pretty sure I got the idea off one of their packages somewhere. Not that Shake 'n Bake is exactly haute cuisine.

I wonder what would happen if you mixed honey and mustard into your egg or mayonnaise then fried it...
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:17 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Maybe not in oil but try dipping your chicken pieces in a honey and mustard mixture, then Shake 'n Bake, then into the oven per package directions. It tastes pretty good and is a nice change from "stock" Shake 'n Bake chicken. I'm pretty sure I got the idea off one of their packages somewhere. Not that Shake 'n Bake is exactly haute cuisine.

I wonder what would happen if you mixed honey and mustard into your egg or mayonnaise then fried it...

Well, you never made mention of shaking and baking, that would certainly have a better chance of making it. Baking is a far less 'violent", in terms of blowing off your coating, compared to frying.

Why not just marinate the chicken in a honey, mustard style of marinade? A honey mustard brine, with garlic, some smoked paprika(to round it out), a little something citrus-y to cut it? I dunno, just throwing it out there.

Honey, is glucose, it would burn before your chicken was cooked.Mustard, burns pretty darn quick too(though I have no molecular science behind it, it just does). I mean, certainly no harm in trying, so whatever blows up your skirt.

Fried chicken CAN be "Haute Cuisine" Though, we won awards to prove it, lol. use to do a Sweet Tea marinated, buttermilk fried chicken, and won quite a few Golden Fork Awards back in the 757, also, Mango Curry Fried Chicken. . .but the breading for that was more like a Korean Style(Think Bon Chon) Style coating, and the key was all about the marinade, and Sous Vide before ever seeing a fryer.
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