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Old 02-09-2009, 03:36 PM   #11
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yOU START BY LEARNING TO EAT. fIRST YOU LEARN TO EAT FOODS THAT TASTE GOOD. tHAT IS YOUR HOME WORK FOR NEXT FEW DAY. wHEN YOU LEARN THAT COME BACK, i WILL TELL YOU THE NEXT STEP. lET ME KNOW. Oops, darn caps, sorry
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:16 AM   #12
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lol! so many replies =D

I haven't tried many different kinds of foods to be honest, thats one of the reasons I wanna learn how to cook too. I'm asian, my grandma cooks in the family and its like mostly empty carb stuff. There is really little vegies too and no fruits at all in my diet So...I'm not a really big fan of most the stuff she cooks too and not really interested in learning from her =X (and theres a bit of a language barrier too.....)

Moving out for college and saving money would be another reason, but whats more important than that to me is being able to eat good tasting meals (and of course wowing the ladies ).

-Callisto in NC
You guessed where I live!!!! I'm north there around 200 miles =] Things from safeway and luckys are expensive compared to asian markets, my mom keeps telling me to get stuff from there instead, but the traffic and parking around the area is pretty crappy, and I don't speak the language well...

-sherifffruitfly
Doooood!!! You sound like you're one with the ladies =] And the garlic thing! Theres always a big measuring cup full of garlic in our fridge, I see it out on the table alot of nights when my grandma is cooking =o
Mixing recipes together is something I'd definitely try later on down the line, I wanna be able to make more "original" meals of my own later on...

I watch food network sometimes!! Theres really nothing else much better on TV anyways. That reminds me, I have made something from there before!!! Its the "blueberry lemon cheesecake" or whatever. Forgot who it was by but it turned out great! I ended up using around 10 spoons and a bunch of other stuff though (lot of cleaning up afterwards). Definitely gonna start watching again. I just subscribed to cooking light too! but they aren't shipping my order til a couple months or so...

OK!! Talking too much!!!

I have my mind on this: Its "Cobb Salad with Green Goddess Dressing" from (****...it wont let me post the link)

Cuz it looks nice and I lack vegies!!! But it says nothing about how to cook the chicken...any ideas?
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:42 AM   #13
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I have a ranch 99 & safeway within 5 minutes of my house so it is a nice luxury when I visit home and stock up on food to bring back to school with me. I enjoy the asian markets because they are a lot cheaper and have ingredients that I can't as easily find in safeway. Are you looking to learn more asain recipes? I'm Chinese, third generation, but we still enjoy many chinese dishes at home.

Also in my experience restaurants usually serve cobb salad with a simple grilled or pan fried chicken. Sometimes it is breaded then fried, but since there is a dressing I'm not really familiar with I can't really suggest any additional seasonings for the chicken.
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Old 02-12-2009, 04:06 PM   #14
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Well, I tell you what then. You seem like a nice guy and you are on the right track. Start with something simple. Like roasted chicken. Here is the simplest recipe ever. Get cut up chicken either whole or some parts, you know like legs, for example. Preheat your oven to 400 deg. Spread the chicken on the baking tray, whatever it's called. Season with same salt and pepper black or I like cayene, but it is very hot, have to be careful. Put chicken in, come back in 1 hour. Eat, enjoy. You can make a side dish. Also simple marinade some vegies, like juliened bell peppers, zukini, red onion, carrots, maybe some portabelo mushrooms, in say Italiang salad dressing for a half an hour or so. Spread them on that same tray thing (what is it called people, I know it's not tray). put them in the oven about 15-20, maybe as much as 30 minutes. You'll have to check them to see how cook you like them. I like mine crunchy. If you cook longer they will be softer. You can do that at the same time a you cook chicken say for the last half an hour. Now when chicken is done, your vegies are also done. Here you have the whole meal. No empty carbs. Vegies and protein. Yum. Simple, is the key word.

Start simple. Slowly you will be able to improove and staret making fancier things. But you have to go out and try things, otherwise you do not know what you are shooting for.
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Old 02-12-2009, 04:28 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Spread them on that same tray thing (what is it called people, I know it's not tray).
Hi, Charlie. It's either a sheet pan or a baking sheet
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Old 02-12-2009, 04:31 PM   #16
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Hi, 1Star. KitchenElf is right - get a good basic cookbook, find things in it you like to eat, and just start Do you like Italian? Pastas are good and easy, and there are lots of ways to change it up, with different sizes and shapes of pasta, different sauces, different meats and vegetables.

My best advice is to make sure you read the recipe thoroughly before starting, and that you understand all the instructions and have all the ingredients. The Betty Crocker book, or something similar, will have definitions for chopped, diced, etc. If there are one or two ingredients you don't like, often you can substitute something else for them - ask here and we'll let you know if it will work. Good luck
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Old 02-12-2009, 04:33 PM   #17
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Cooking in my opinion comes from the heart. I never knew how to cook until I lived alone and experimented with various spices, dishes. I kept tasting the food until I felt it was right. You shouldn't be afraid, try cooking alone for yourself first, then the next time invite a close friend or two to dinner and cook for them and ask for their honest opinion. Another thing I learnt, was to eat out and try and 'feel' the food, more like, 'is that garlic I taste, what is that sweetness, is it from sugar or ketchup(ketchup does taste sweet, but that's according to my tastebuds) When you chew food feel the firmness, lightness crispness etc. Just go with the flow and enjoy the meal. Most ingredients can be found in a lot of supermarkets these days, so if you are following a recipe, you can't go wrong, and if you are stuck for substitute, ask on DC and you will find help, we all love food afterall. Happyy cooking 1*restaurant.
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Old 02-12-2009, 09:31 PM   #18
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Get two or three good cookbooks, as mentioned above. I recommend Joy of Cooking first, because it gives you so many basics, then Better Homes and Garden and Fannie Farmer.
But don't just pick a recipe...first read and study,and then start with the simplest skills first.
Then, start picking the brains of people you know whose cooking you like. Most will be happy to answer questions, give you a favorite recipe, and even let you watch while they prepare it. That's something that helped me a with a lot of skills.

Once you get the hang of assorted methods, you will learn to start adjusting recipes to your own taste.

That's my advice, for what it's worth.
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Old 02-12-2009, 10:33 PM   #19
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Nothing beats cooking with someone who knows how to cook already, like parents, grandparents ..... Not onlhy do you get the one on one time, but you get to learn recipes that have been passed down in the family. Next would be the cooking shows, books .... And finally, a whole lot of trial and error. Ive made many good dishes, but have also thrown many away, or had that emergency ' have to order in tonight'...
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Old 02-12-2009, 11:15 PM   #20
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As to good cook books, I love any of the Alton Brown books (he of Good Eats fame on the Food Network). They teach you, not just the hows of cooking, but also the whys in what you are doing. Plus he's pretty funny. I just got his book on Baking and I'm learning and laughing my behind off.
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