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Old 02-05-2009, 06:16 PM   #31
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You posted that method before, right? I used it after reading about it here (probly from you) and it's GREAT!


<I think I might have brined the chix, though> Will try it unbrined soon.
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Old 02-05-2009, 06:27 PM   #32
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If you are talking about the Chied Fricken idea Miss Jenny....I've got that on my to do list....Hmmm maybe tomorrow night!
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Old 02-05-2009, 07:12 PM   #33
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Brine all you want but I say a good but some what short marinade works just as well for grilling, baking etc I keep my brining if I brine at all to whole birds and thats it.
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Old 02-06-2009, 07:34 AM   #34
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To brine or not to brine? Mmm, I think the key is not to overcook, that way you will have nice meat. However you prepare it.
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Old 02-06-2009, 08:18 AM   #35
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I agree with SoupDragon that overcooking is the reason meat dries out. Brining adds flavor and adds a buffer against accidental overcooking though. When I want to ensure a juicy chicken I always brine, but I also watch the temp very closely.
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Old 02-06-2009, 08:42 AM   #36
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I used to be a confirmed briner but have switched to
koshering - just salting the raw chicken all over and letting
it sit about 2 hours. I find the result is fine and much shorter time
than brining. I got the method from America's Test Kitchen.

I cook whole chicken @375 until breast reaches 160F.
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Old 02-06-2009, 08:52 AM   #37
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Another term for that Mike is dry bringing. What happens is that the salt initially draws moisture out of the chicken, but then the salt dissolves and you are left with salt water which then gets drawn back into the bird, just like with wet brining. It is a great technique. You can actually even do it even longer than 2 hours before cooking. Overnight is not a bad amount of time for that technique.
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Old 02-06-2009, 09:10 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
Another term for that Mike is dry bringing. What happens is that the salt initially draws moisture out of the chicken, but then the salt dissolves and you are left with salt water which then gets drawn back into the bird, just like with wet brining. It is a great technique. You can actually even do it even longer than 2 hours before cooking. Overnight is not a bad amount of time for that technique.
I've heard it works particularly well with steak. Do you know if that's true?
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Old 02-06-2009, 09:22 AM   #39
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Yep it is very true.
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Old 02-06-2009, 09:46 AM   #40
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Excellent! I have a couple of very nice rib-eyes for the weekend!
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