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Old 04-11-2012, 12:25 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I agree on all counts.

And will add that the quality of the poultry matters, too. I'll never buy Perdue or store brand again.

We brined and grilled a Bell and Evans chicken last night and it was SODALICIOUS!!
I don't like white chicken meat. but I once bought a Bell & Evans, and it was worth every extra cent. Perdue is so overprocessed.
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Old 04-11-2012, 03:33 PM   #12
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For cooking individual pieces like drumsticks, I very lightly fry the pieces in a cast iron skillet (very little oil) while the oven is preheating to about 325F. It's just a light frying to bring out the taste of the seasonings I sprinkle on, and also to sear the skin a little (without making it crispy). This seems to help retain the moisture while the chicken bakes in the skillet placed in the oven.
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Old 04-11-2012, 03:36 PM   #13
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CI did a up-side-down bird. First brined, then started the roast with the backbone up {or upside down} then flipped over to finish and to brown the skin. With this method the fattier dark meat self-bastes the white meat. I agree however with all the other posters, regardless of the method, not over cooking and using a meat thermometer is essential.
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Old 04-11-2012, 03:43 PM   #14
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Yes, a lot of recipes have you baking the chicken at 375F - 400F or something which I think is too high. Just cook it longer at 325F to 350F temp to reach the ideal and safe interior temps. These slightly lower temps work ideal if you first get the cooking process started by searing the chicken in a skillet for a short time. IMO
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Old 04-11-2012, 05:52 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PolishedTopaz View Post
CI did a up-side-down bird. First brined, then started the roast with the backbone up {or upside down} then flipped over to finish and to brown the skin. With this method the fattier dark meat self-bastes the white meat. I agree however with all the other posters, regardless of the method, not over cooking and using a meat thermometer is essential.
I use instructions from Joy of Cooking 1997 edition:
25 minutes for the first 4 pounds of bird + 3 minutes for each additional pound of bird on one side. Then flip it to the other side and roast for the same amount of time. Then flip it on its back for 15 - 30 minutes. All of that in a 400 F oven.

Juicy white meat, sufficiently cooked dark meat, and the back isn't soggy with all the good juices. The skin comes out crispy too. I've even done this with turkey (at my MIL's place) and it worked well.

The flipping on the side points the legs at the top and bottom of the oven, which is where the heat comes from, so the dark meat gets a chance to cook a bit more than the white meat.
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Old 04-11-2012, 07:45 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I use instructions from Joy of Cooking 1997 edition:
25 minutes for the first 4 pounds of bird + 3 minutes for each additional pound of bird on one side. Then flip it to the other side and roast for the same amount of time. Then flip it on its back for 15 - 30 minutes. All of that in a 400 F oven.

Juicy white meat, sufficiently cooked dark meat, and the back isn't soggy with all the good juices. The skin comes out crispy too. I've even done this with turkey (at my MIL's place) and it worked well.

The flipping on the side points the legs at the top and bottom of the oven, which is where the heat comes from, so the dark meat gets a chance to cook a bit more than the white meat.
They (Rombauer & Becker) have some great advice in Joy of Cooking! It was my principal reference 20 years before the Internet, and I still find their advice useful and informative in the present day.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:06 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
They (Rombauer & Becker) have some great advice in Joy of Cooking! It was my principal reference 20 years before the Internet, and I still find their advice useful and informative in the present day.
I'm not sure it was advice from Rombauer & Becker. That particular edition of Joy of Cooking was turned over to professional chefs and is not one I would recommend. They were trying to "improve" it.

Apparently, there was so much complaint and uproar about it that there is now a newer one that is more true to the original authors.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:18 PM   #18
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Thanks TL for telling me the info. I'm pretty sure I bought my current Joy of Cooking perhaps sometime in the '80s, after my original paperback perhaps from the early '70s. I never knew they horsed it up later after I bought my reference copy in the '80s. Mine is in like new condition (unlike my first copy) and one thing for sure, they'll have to personally visit me to mess up my own copy.
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:48 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Thanks TL for telling me the info. I'm pretty sure I bought my current Joy of Cooking perhaps sometime in the '80s, after my original paperback perhaps from the early '70s. I never knew they horsed it up later after I bought my reference copy in the '80s. Mine is in like new condition (unlike my first copy) and one thing for sure, they'll have to personally visit me to mess up my own copy.
The recipe for rotated roast chicken is the only thing I like about the 1997 edition. I much prefer the previous, 1975 edition.
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Old 04-11-2012, 10:05 PM   #20
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That's probably what I have, the '75 edition. I updated mine around the time I bought my first house. My cookbooks are in storage at present time so I can't look and tell for sure.

They should have known to not mess with Rombauer and Becker.
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