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Old 03-23-2014, 02:36 PM   #1
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Speaking of beef, when did chuck roast (which is good for grinding into hambuger) get so expensive? It's roughly the same price as lean hamburger, close to $5/lb.
C&P from a dinner thread.

A lot of food prices have risen sharply recently, mostly due to drought and disease among some food animals. They will be rising more this year because of the ongoing drought in California. This article is interesting, and a little scary: http://www.dallasnews.com/business/h...rices-rise.ece

This is why I typically buy meats and poultry on sale. Chuck roast this week is on sale for $3.99/lb., London Broil for $2.99/lb., and bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts for 99 cents/lb.
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Old 03-23-2014, 02:56 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
C&P from a dinner thread.

A lot of food prices have risen sharply recently, mostly due to drought and disease among some food animals. They will be rising more this year because of the ongoing drought in California. This article is interesting, and a little scary: Breakfast costing more as U.S. food prices rise | Dallas Morning News

This is why I typically buy meats and poultry on sale. Chuck roast this week is on sale for $3.99/lb., London Broil for $2.99/lb., and bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts for 99 cents/lb.

I've been watching the prices too. I just bought a boneless chuck roast for the freezer on sale for $3.69/Lb.
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Old 03-23-2014, 03:04 PM   #3
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I guess that's the price I pay for buying certain meats on sale and freezing them. I had no idea chuck roast had risen that much. The last time I bought it it was 2 something a pound.
What I noticed was it being the same price as ground meat, so while hamburger has stayed pretty much the same, chuck roast has caught up to it.
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Old 03-23-2014, 03:05 PM   #4
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I've been watching the prices at the market rise, too. In one week, milk went from $2.48 per gallon to $2.99 per gallon. Pretty hefty hike in a week's time.

A box of saltine crackers went from $.87 to $1.29 in a week as well.

I'm trying to figure out why frozen vegetables have gone off the scale. Baby lima beans and cauliflower are out of sight.
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Old 03-23-2014, 03:40 PM   #5
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It's not just the drought or disease that jacks up food costs. It cost piles of money to run farm equipment and then haul the stuff to processors or market. It's not unusual to see a 5000 gallon fuel truck come down the road daily, sometimes twice a day to make deliveries. Tractors gulp fuel.
And it's a real person with a family that likes to be paid more than minimum wage that's picking the stuff and we know that we are all rooting for higher wages for all.
If water is available, it costs money to get it above ground and to the plant growing the food for man or beast to eat. The real mystery is how in the world the farmer has managed this long. Very little food is grown in a back garden of the market.
The reason for a hefty in one week might be because it took awhile for that particular market/distributor to sell off the old inventory that they warehoused at an old price.
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Old 03-23-2014, 03:44 PM   #6
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Everything is so interconnected to that final price that if one domino wobbles the entire stack starts to shake. The article mentioned higher feed prices contribute to the final cost of the meat. Remember that every time you put the ethanol-blend gas in your car tank, for the corn that could have fed the pig is now feeding your car. Maybe we should just all start riding pigs?
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Old 03-23-2014, 04:24 PM   #7
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I have also noticed the price of things going up rather quickly. The small family owned market where I buy my meat has roasts that are cheaper than the ground beef. The pricier steaks and chops seem to be holding steady. I see the increase in the cost of ground beef as a hidden tax on families that have come to rely on ground beef as a staple.

I have started scratching my head and digging out some old recipes that use no meat or small amounts of meat. I forget to make some of the old recipes that I grew up with. It is nice to rediscover them and put them back on the menu.

Things like,

Beans and greens
Fried peppers and eggs
Marinara sauce with tuna, capers, olives, etc... over long macaroni
Omelets

What things are you serving now to keep the food budget under control?
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Old 03-23-2014, 04:49 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
I've been watching the prices at the market rise, too. In one week, milk went from $2.48 per gallon to $2.99 per gallon. Pretty hefty hike in a week's time.

A box of saltine crackers went from $.87 to $1.29 in a week as well.

I'm trying to figure out why frozen vegetables have gone off the scale. Baby lima beans and cauliflower are out of sight.
Can't compare milk prices as there is something of a price war led by Aldi at the moment so a UK gallon is costing 1 (our pint is 20 ounces compared with your 16oz). Rooking the farmers, of course. Tesco in particular is famous for paying milk producers less than what it costs them to produce it and the 1 gallon is doubtless making matters worse.
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Old 03-23-2014, 05:12 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
C&P from a dinner thread.

A lot of food prices have risen sharply recently, mostly due to drought and disease among some food animals. They will be rising more this year because of the ongoing drought in California. This article is interesting, and a little scary: Breakfast costing more as U.S. food prices rise | Dallas Morning News

This is why I typically buy meats and poultry on sale. Chuck roast this week is on sale for $3.99/lb., London Broil for $2.99/lb., and bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts for 99 cents/lb.
I'd say I wish I lived in the USA for food prices if it wasn't for your medical costs. As an example, supermarket basics chuck here is about $6.70lb!!! Mind you, here it's more or less the same cut but it's stewed or braised, not roasted. Chicken breasts come as fillets without the bone and are around $6lb. London broil doesn't exist in British butchery (how odd, given the name).
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Old 03-23-2014, 05:24 PM   #10
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I have also noticed the price of things going up rather quickly. The small family owned market where I buy my meat has roasts that are cheaper than the ground beef. The pricier steaks and chops seem to be holding steady. I see the increase in the cost of ground beef as a hidden tax on families that have come to rely on ground beef as a staple...
Steaks and chops are steady here, too.
It has me wondering if a new use has been found for chuck roast. Like people have said that skirt steak took a price jump when it became popular.
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