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Old 04-06-2007, 04:30 AM   #1
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Exclamation Substitution for cream cheese ?

What is best substitute of cream cheese? And how can I differentiate between single and double cream.

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Sarah

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Old 04-06-2007, 05:50 AM   #2
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Hello Sarah

I use quark, instead, of cream cheese sometimes.
Sometimes, I use cream or cottage cheese. Depends on the receipe.
I often wonder about the single and double cream too. The cream in my local supermarkets is just labeled fresh cream. It does not say, if it is single or double.

Mel
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Old 04-06-2007, 06:53 AM   #3
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Neufchatel cheese is a reasonable substitute for cream cheese. If you buy Philly brand 1/3 lees fat cream cheese, it's labeled as Neufchatel.

To differentiate among creams, you have to go by fat content. Double cream has a fat percentage in excess of 40%.
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Old 04-06-2007, 06:55 AM   #4
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In which recipe? Could depend on the type of recipes, in most cases mascarpone is great, though it is more expensive, it is creamier and richer, actually improves the taste of the end result.

I am not sure about single or double cream but I am guessing the difference in the content of milk fat percentage. Here in Italy we have cream for cooking with 25% milk fat, and cream for whipping with 35% milk fat. Could be the similar difference?
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Old 04-06-2007, 07:02 AM   #5
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Thanks Mel,
The cream available in the market with labeled Fresh cream what ever the brand it is. There are several recipes which show both in one recipe.

The key issue is the fat content. Double cream, which has a minimum butterfat content of 48 percent.

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Sarah
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Old 04-06-2007, 04:14 PM   #6
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This may not be correct, but I was always under the assumption that "double cream" was what the markets regularly call "heavy" or "whipping" cream, while "single cream" was what the markets regularly call "half and half".
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Old 04-06-2007, 04:56 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
This may not be correct, but I was always under the assumption that "double cream" was what the markets regularly call "heavy" or "whipping" cream, while "single cream" was what the markets regularly call "half and half".
Actually, double cream picks up where heavy cream leaves off. Heavy cream usually tops out at a fat content of 40% while double cream starts with a fat content of about 42%. I guess single cream is about half the fat content of double cream, making it equivalent to light cream.
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:44 PM   #8
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Depending on the use of the Cream Cheese, you might make some yogurt cheese and use it.

Put a cup of good yogurt in a strainer above a bowl and let it set for 1-2 hours or all night in the reefer. The whey will drain off leaving a cheese like mass. It is good. My wife and son make it from nonfat yogurt and use it on toast like they would cream cheese. I've also used it instead of sour cream in some things.
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Old 04-06-2007, 09:11 PM   #9
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The natural health food stores who offer a dairy line have the double cream products. They also offer alternatives for processed foods. Just a reminder that no preservatives means no shelf life; purchase as needed and never stock up.
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