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Old 08-26-2012, 11:01 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Volume in liters should not be a problem if readers are reminded that 236 ml = 8 fluid ounces; likewise weight in kg should not be a problem if readers are reminded that 100 g = 3.5 ounces. People, who cannot handle that, need to start eating a lot more fish.
I am sure every American from our generation knows that a kilo is 2.2 pounds, even if they never actually purchased one!

I buy my onions already chopped, in a 2 pound bag. I put the chopped onions, 1/2 cup at a time, into sandwich bags, then put them all into a zip-lock bag and freeze them. If the recipe calls for volume, I've got it covered, and if it calls for quantity, well, one baggie is a small onion and two baggies are a medium/large onion. Same with bell peppers. I buy them on sale (all colours), gut them, julianne them, toss them into a ziplock freezer bag and stick them in the freezer door. When the recipe calls for bell pepper, I pull out the required coulor(s) in what appears to be the proper quantity and if neccessary dice or chop them when they thaw.
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Old 08-26-2012, 11:13 AM   #32
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Many from my generation were overseas when kilocycles was replaced by kilohertz and LBJ instituted his great society and immigration reform programs.
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Old 09-26-2013, 06:16 PM   #33
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Great to hear that one can use the metric system when posting recipes. I was a bit worried I would have to convert everything if I wanted to post. But it seems like there are a lot of different nationalities here, and I guess people use different systems. Now what recipes should I share...
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Old 09-26-2013, 08:15 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Ezil View Post
...Now what recipes should I share...
...just the good ones!

Welcome to DC, Ezil.
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Old 09-27-2013, 05:10 AM   #35
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...just the good ones!

Welcome to DC, Ezil.
But of course! :) Thank you for the welcome!
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:53 PM   #36
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Luca,

I'd say use whatever you're comfortable with. Most Americans understand metric well enough to make the conversions (We are all taught the metric system in school at a young age. We just refuse to use it. ).

All of my measuring cups are labeled in both ml and American units, and I also own a kitchen scale that weighs in both grams and ounces. In addition, most packaged foods in stores have both units on the label.

I like the metric system myself. For winemaking, it's the only thing I use.

Steve
People keep telling me that metric is easier. Not for this cook, when she spent the first 30 years of life struggling to learn and then use the "imperial" system, it isn't.

I love American cookery books that use pounds and ounces although I struggle a bit with the accuracy of my cup measurements! I sometimes scoop cups of flour as taught by the sainted Ina and then weigh them to check and I never seem to get the same weight of flour in my scoop twice on the trot!

We're lucky in the UK that most sets of weighing scales still come with both metric and imperial measurements but over the last year or so I've noticed a worrying tendency for newly published cook books to only show metric measurements for ingredients.

I think I'm a bit of a luddite when it comes to the metric system. I'm also dyscalculic which doesn't help me make sense of how much 175 grammes is or what a litre looks like. And don't get me started on bra sizes!!
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:05 PM   #37
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Incidentally, when they were writing the legislation for UK's conversion to the metric system, their research persuaded them that there would be an outcry if milk and beer were to be included so the eventual Act of Parliament stated that beer and milk would be sold in imperial pints (20 fluid ounces) as an exception. Beer still is and most milk is, although a few companies produce milk in metric plastic containers but they still have to have both the metric and the imperial equivalent shown on the bottle.
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:23 PM   #38
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Thanks!



1 pints snails!!!
It goes back to the volume or cup style of measurement which still exists in the US. Before metrication in England many fishmongers sold shellfish, such as shrimps, cockles, etc., in pints, measuring them with a legally regulated pint measuring container and I'm sure that I've seen an American TV cook using pints of solid ingredients such as shrimp or blueberries.
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:35 PM   #39
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Hello Luca, as I live in England I find recipes giving cups as a measure rather than weight perplexing. I keep meaning to buy a set of U.S.A. cup measures but only remember when I am reading the actual recipe, and so it goes on. Metric weight is my preference.

I would like the size of the onion to be stated too, unless it was given by weight. Half a large onion or half a small one - a lot of difference.

I think I really agree with no mayonnaise in this (really love mayonnaise though).
The Tala range of kitchen tools has a set of white plastic measuring cups which are based on American cups. Most cook shops and hardware shops stock them and they are dirt cheap. I've got a set but I can't get to grips with the cup system.

I know that when you measure soft brown sugar you pack it down in the measure and when you measure flour you don't but what about sieving flour? Do you sift before or after scooping it? Surely a scoop of sifted flour and a scoop of unsifted flour are not going to weigh the same?
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Old 09-27-2013, 08:48 PM   #40
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...what about sieving flour? Do you sift before or after scooping it? Surely a scoop of sifted flour and a scoop of unsifted flour are not going to weigh the same?


1 C Flour, sifted - Sift after measuring

1 C Sifted Flour - Sift before measuring

This assumes the recipe writer knows the difference.
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