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Old 03-22-2015, 02:29 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post

You were born in MN, didn't you eat hotdishes before you moved to CA, Kayelle?
I wasn't eating solid food when we left MN for CA. Many years later when my Mom died, I found a recipe in her little recipe box for "Minnesota Hot Dish" That's the first time I ever heard the term and I don't remember her making it. Then again, returning to CA was going back home for her.
I grew up with the word "casserole".
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Old 03-22-2015, 02:34 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Jennyemma, just curious, how do you define second generation? I looked it up in Wikipedia This is what they write:

"Like "first-generation immigrant," the term "second-generation" can refer to a member of either:
  • the second generation of a family to inhabit, but the first to be natively born in, a country, or
  • the second generation to be born in a country."
There does not seem to be a consensus. However, "first generation immigrant" is not correct. You are either an immigrant or natural born.
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Old 03-22-2015, 02:57 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I'm 2nd generation Swedish born in Minneapolis, lived near 50th and Lyndale. Harmon Killebrew was our neighbor! If you remember Bronson-Erickson realty that was us.

Still never once uttered the word hot dish. It was always casserole. I know about the regional thing now, though, but we never used the term. We did have a lot of smorgasbords!

Moved to Cedar Rapids. Never heard of a ham ball. A Maidrite yes. Ham ball no.

Then on to Boston and the endless debate about a proper lobster roll.
The school cafeteria served a lot of hotdishes in Bloomington--I particularly did not like the macaroni-tomato-tuna hotdish. However, it was better than the macaroni-cheese-tomato-tuna one my mother made. I was not sorry to see that leave the weekly recipe rotation!

BTW, Minneapolis claims to be the home of what is called Minnesota Tarter Tot hotdish. (hotdish is one word when a noun, two words when an adjective). I have never eaten a ham ball, but Iowa and hog farms do go together.
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Old 03-22-2015, 03:27 PM   #74
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
The school cafeteria served a lot of hotdishes in Bloomington--I particularly did not like the macaroni-tomato-tuna hotdish. However, it was better than the macaroni-cheese-tomato-tuna one my mother made. I was not sorry to see that leave the weekly recipe rotation!

BTW, Minneapolis claims to be the home of what is called Minnesota Tarter Tot hotdish. (hotdish is one word when a noun, two words when an adjective). I have never eaten a ham ball, but Iowa and hog farms do go together.
My Minnesota born and raised mother had a recipe for ham balls (probably cut from a magazine as a lot of her stuff was), but I do believe that it has not come down to any of us kids. I know that my sister and brother did not like them at all, and while I liked them, it just didn't cross my mind at any time when I was cherry picking her recipes.
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Old 03-22-2015, 03:37 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
...

Other thoughts: Everyone has heard of bologna or baloney, but out here in rural northeastern Colorado, they call it "minced ham". I thought my wife was talking about deviled ham the first time the subject came up between us. I just though she was weird, but another friend of hers from Iowa grew up with the same term. When I lived in Montana, the roads didn't have a ditch on the side, it was a "barrow pit", and the car didn't have a glove compartment, it was a "jockey box". Also no ravines or arroyos, instead they were "coolies".
Well, that explains Frank's signature:

Quote:
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
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Old 03-22-2015, 03:47 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Well, that explains Frank's signature:
I was just thinking the same thing Taxi.
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Old 03-22-2015, 03:58 PM   #77
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And where Frank's grandma was raised/lived?
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Old 03-22-2015, 04:49 PM   #78
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Re: Defining first and second generation - I found the following on the US Census website. It's an excerpt from a report:

**********************
The U.S. Census Bureau reports that 36.7 million of the nation's population (12 percent) were foreign-born, and another 33 million (11 percent) were native-born with at least one foreign-born parent in 2009, making one in five people either first or second generation U.S. residents. The second generation were more likely than the foreign born to be better educated and have higher earnings and less likely to be in poverty...
**********************

The bolded phrases suggest the first generation was foreign born and moved here and their children were the second generation.

I don't know if you want to accept the US Census Bureau as an acknowledged authority but at least we know how it's viewed for "official" purposes.
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Old 03-22-2015, 05:07 PM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Re: Defining first and second generation - I found the following on the US Census website. It's an excerpt from a report:

**********************
The U.S. Census Bureau reports that 36.7 million of the nation's population (12 percent) were foreign-born, and another 33 million (11 percent) were native-born with at least one foreign-born parent in 2009, making one in five people either first or second generation U.S. residents. The second generation were more likely than the foreign born to be better educated and have higher earnings and less likely to be in poverty...
**********************

The bolded phrases suggest the first generation was foreign born and moved here and their children were the second generation.

I don't know if you want to accept the US Census Bureau as an acknowledged authority but at least we know how it's viewed for "official" purposes.
That was mentioned in the Wikipedia article. But, general usage isn't nearly that tidy. And, it doesn't really answer what jennyemma meant.
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Old 03-22-2015, 06:34 PM   #80
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Well, that explains Frank's signature:
Me three! I always wondered what Frank meant by that signature line.
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