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Old 03-05-2008, 04:40 PM   #1
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Talking Help with "Country Greens", please?

Mission-I will be preparing (2) 1 pound bags of mixed greens tonight.
They are the prewashed somewhat trimmed type avail in a bag at the local megamart. A mix of Collard, Mustard, and Turnip greens.

I have a 1 pound pack of pork sausage links I was thinking of using for flavor. I was thinking skin and brown them and throw em in there with the greens, grease and all. I have a pretty full pantry and lots of fresh veggies. Not sure if I have chicken stock, but it can be acquired, I do have cream of mushroom soup if I decide to go the creamed greens route. I only have regular vinegar.

Background- I have seen true greensologists prepare them a long time in the dorm kitchen at in my college days, but I am kinda unfamiliar at doing it myself without a greens connoisseur helping me along. My significant other had never even tried greens so I bought her a can of some flavored greens and she fell in love with them. I remember the joy of fresh Southern Style Greens, and they are much better.

Goal- To make a better batch of greens than the canned stuff I bought.
Not too spicy, not to salty. Yet, full of flavor.

I don't think this is an impossible mission. Will the kind and generous chefs of D.C come to my aid?

Please?

I will be doing a lil homework here over the next few hours, but any tried and true advice will be appreciated. Thanks in advance for any suggestions, and I will try to remember to take some pics to post.
Recipes : Collard Greens : Food Network
This one looked interesting. I don't quite know what way I am going to approach this but if y'all got some ideas let me know...... Thanks.

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Old 03-05-2008, 05:31 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hookied_up View Post
Mission-I will be preparing (2) 1 pound bags of mixed greens tonight.
They are the prewashed somewhat trimmed type avail in a bag at the local megamart. A mix of Collard, Mustard, and Turnip greens.

I have a 1 pound pack of pork sausage links I was thinking of using for flavor. I was thinking skin and brown them and throw em in there with the greens, grease and all. I have a pretty full pantry and lots of fresh veggies. Not sure if I have chicken stock, but it can be acquired, I do have cream of mushroom soup if I decide to go the creamed greens route. I only have regular vinegar.

Background- I have seen true greensologists prepare them a long time in the dorm kitchen at in my college days, but I am kinda unfamiliar at doing it myself without a greens connoisseur helping me along. My significant other had never even tried greens so I bought her a can of some flavored greens and she fell in love with them. I remember the joy of fresh Southern Style Greens, and they are much better.

Goal- To make a better batch of greens than the canned stuff I bought.
Not too spicy, not to salty. Yet, full of flavor.

I don't think this is an impossible mission. Will the kind and generous chefs of D.C come to my aid?

Please?

I will be doing a lil homework here over the next few hours, but any tried and true advice will be appreciated. Thanks in advance for any suggestions, and I will try to remember to take some pics to post.
Recipes : Collard Greens : Food Network
This one looked interesting. I don't quite know what way I am going to approach this but if y'all got some ideas let me know...... Thanks.
the sausage is not what I would use. I prefer a ham hock or other fatty ham pieces. Sausage is a pretty complex flavor for the greens.

Try putting a little vinegar on them when they are done. Brings out the flavor!
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Old 03-05-2008, 05:39 PM   #3
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First, remove the big stems then chop (chiffonade) or in a rough chop but not small pieces. Washing in a sink of water, swishing, the dirt will fall to the bottom of the sink. Just stack the leaves, remove the biggest stems, slice in rows, then slice again to make big squares.

Here's what I do:

Put greens in a big pot with some beef broth - medium heat - salt after they have started to wilt a bit. The beef broth doesn't have to be a lot, just about an inch or so. Toss in a bit of vegetable/canola oil - maybe 2 TBS. Keep tossing the greens for even cooking. It shouldn't take any longer than 45 minutes to cook the greens. Just taste as you go for salt.

That's it. Yes, a ham hock would work too but I don't cook mine long enough for the flavor to REALLY come out! The beef broth works great! I have found some ham broth recently but the beef broth is still better.

The End - enjoy!

When I cook mine this way (not cooked to death) I find I don't want the vinegar on mine. You can use apple cider or white - either one if you want to.
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Old 03-05-2008, 07:06 PM   #4
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The very first thing I do before going behind the house to gather greens to cook is to start my cooking water on the stove. I like lots of pot likker so I may use more water than some. To the water, I add one of.. or a combination of the following. Bacon, Smoked Ham Hocks, Chunks of ham, Smoked pork neck bones, salt pork, Left over ham bone, bacon drippings etc. and a good bit of salt. bring it up to a boil, reduce to a slow simmer, and cover. By the time I gather, de-stem, wash etc. the "broth" is good to go. I add the greens and within an hour or so they are ready. Check for salt along. They need to be (for my taste) a little salty.

Your greens are bagged and probably washed, but I would still wash them anyway. Start you flavoring meat(s) as described above, and do something else for an hour. Then cook them. Served with hot pepper sauce is a plus. Served with Hot Cornbread is a big plus. Quarter up a few turnip roots and add during the last 20-30 minutes is yet another plus. Serve them in a bowl with plenty of pot likker. When you are finished with the greens...pick up the bowl and drink the remaing pot likker.

Enjoy!!!!!!
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Old 03-07-2008, 08:39 PM   #5
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Well, hookied_up, if you wanted Southern Style greens Uncle Bob just gave you a crash course! My grandmother also came from a small town in Mississippi - and that's the way she did greens.

Just a couple of comments. While the diced turnip is optional to some people I wouldn't leave it out - and the cornbread really is not optional, you need it to sop up that pot likker - or, as UB said, drink it (there is a significant amount of nutrients in that juice).

As for the hot sauce - look for something called Trappey's Hot Peppers in Vinegar (picture of bottle) - usually around where the Tabasco Sauces are in the grocery. It's green tabasco peppers in white vinegar. It's really not hot ... but a few drops adds just the right amount of kick not only from the flavor of the peppers but also from the vinegar. And, the nice thing is - when you use it up - refill it with more white vinegar, stick back the cabinet for a month or two - you're good to go again.
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Old 03-07-2008, 08:50 PM   #6
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Here's my take on Greens. Recipe passed down to me by my "Other Mother," who was from Memphis. This recipe says Collards, but it works just as well with Mustards, Turnips, Kale, or a mixture. This dish is designed to serve as either a main course with rice, or as a side with anything you please. You may make them with or without meat, but the flavors are so assertive these greens don’t need it.

Collard Greens

makes 6 servings

6 pounds collard greens
3 tablespoons canola oil
1 cup finely chopped onions
1 cup finely chopped celery
1 cup finely chopped green bell pepper
1 or 2 small fresh hot peppers, seeded, deribbed and finely chopped
1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
3 pounds meaty ham hocks or shanks (optional, but delicious!)
3 bay leaves
1 1/2 cups cold water
2 tablespoons fresh thyme (or 2 teaspoons dried)
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh oregano (or 1 1/2 teaspoons dried)
2 teaspoons Creole Seasoning
Hot pepper sauce to taste

1. Pull the coarse stems all the way out of the collards, and wash the leaves very well in several changes of cold water.
2. Heat the oil in a large, heavy saucepan or Dutch oven. Add mirepoix and meat (if you are using meat) and sauté the vegetables until the onion is translucent.
3. Tear the greens into bite-sized pieces and add to the pan. Stir to coat greens with the vegetable mixture and oil. Add seasonings and water. Cover the pan and bring to a boil. Simmer over low heat for approximately one hour.
4. Allow the greens to sit in their liquor while you remove the hocks and cut them into bite-sized pieces. (If there is a lot of liquor in the pan, you may wish to reduce it by one-half.) Be sure to discard all the bone, skin and gristle. Stir the meat back into the pot. Serve hot.

Wine Tip: If you’re making these greens the center of your plate, choose a Riesling from Alsace to go with it. I think California Rieslings are too sweet for this dish.
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Old 03-07-2008, 09:55 PM   #7
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Miss June......Your recipe reminds me more of Gumbo Z'Herbs (served with rice etc.), than Southern/Country "Greens". However, there is not enough liquid present for the Gumbo dish. Sounds tasty and interesting however! Thanks for sharing!

Enjoy!
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Old 03-08-2008, 07:46 AM   #8
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Uncle Bob, Yesssssssssssss! I'm going to the store now. Wish I had some in my backyard.
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Old 03-08-2008, 09:04 AM   #9
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Uncle Bob, Yesssssssssssss! I'm going to the store now. Wish I had some in my backyard.
Me too!!! For the first time since Moby Dick was a tiny minnow, my green crop was a dismal failure this year. Normally I have enough turnip greens/roots and mustard to feed 1/2 of my County. According to the County Extension Office some kind of "funK" that was/is in the soil. Gotta wait 3 years before planting (greens) there again. It has been a long, sad, and depressing fall and winter for me. However with the help of a few generous neighbors and regular trips to the therapist I have managed to make it through Next year I will be in "New" ground, and once again can enjoy my 3 or 4 times minimum per week ration of greens & roots!! While you're at the store go ahead and pick up some Catfish...Fried Catfish and and big bowl of greens is a little bit of Heaven

Have Fun!!!! Enjoy!!!
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