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Old 12-01-2006, 02:34 PM   #11
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Thank you all! I am going to try parboiling like suggested, rough 'em up, preheat my pan - low sided - with oil - cook them at a higher temp - lets see what happens! I am so hungry I may start dinner early! Thank you all!
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Old 12-01-2006, 02:35 PM   #12
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I often start them in a large cast iron skillet on the stove, then finish them in a high oven. The hot cast iron keeps browning the bottoms and the oven crisps the tops. Turn and toss them a few times of course.

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Old 12-01-2006, 05:13 PM   #13
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Never tried roughing them up, that sound like a good idea. I agree with cooking them first and then turning up the heat to roast them.
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Old 12-01-2006, 05:16 PM   #14
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Sometimes a little less oil is better (did I just say that????). Too much can make your taters soft if you don't heat them up fast enough.
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Old 12-01-2006, 06:04 PM   #15
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You might need to check on the variety of potatoes to use for best results. Varieties differ from country to country, but you need to know which ones are good for mashing, and which ones are good for roasting or for chips etc. The 'mashing' ones don't always brown and crisp up well.

You will always get a really good crunchy coating on roast potatoes if you use high heat, and if you roll the potatoes in flour before putting them into the oven. You can partially cook the potatoes first (a microwave is handy for this), then turn the heat to very high to finish them off.

If you're roasting potatoes in the same pan as your roast chicken, the potatoes will come up mushy. Put your veges in a different pan. You could also think of 'dry roasting' them. To do this, I use a separate dish, spray it and the veges with some cooking oil, and roast them that way.
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Old 12-01-2006, 06:04 PM   #16
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I cut mine into wedges or chunks and toss them in Olive oil. I then put the potatoes on a foil-covered baking sheet, sprinkle with garlic/herb seasoning, toss again, then spread out and place in top half of 400 degree oven. I usually turn only once.
They always turn out crisp, with browned crunchy edges. Yum!

You can flavor them all kinds of different ways...try using onion soup mix, ranch dressing mix, or taco seasoning.

Leftover baked potatoes roast well, but it seems to me that par-boiling the spuds would make them mushy. I've never tried it, however, so what do I know?
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Old 12-01-2006, 06:10 PM   #17
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You only par-boil them until the edges are softened - the potatoes aren't cooked... it's just enough to allow you to shake the pan vigorously and the outsides become a little 'fluffy'. When you add goose-fat into the equation... manna!
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Old 12-01-2006, 06:17 PM   #18
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I do them in a roasting pan, 350 degrees or maybe 375, that is covered with foil for about half an hour or so, a bit more if there are a lot of taters (I toss them in oil first and add some spices and maybe some onion chunks).

That steams them.

Then take off the foil, up the heat to 400 or so, and wait until they are nice and crisp on the outside and nice and soft on the inside. Never really time the stuff so it is by the seat of my pants.

Advantage of method is you don't have to parboil first.

Just my way of doing it.
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Old 12-01-2006, 07:29 PM   #19
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What kind of potatoes do you all use?
I usually use russets, but Yukon Gold and any kind of baby new potatoes are quite delicious as well.

I love roasted vegetables in general...carrots, peppers, onions, tomatoes...I've never tried sweet potatoes, though. My husband is not a big fan of them, but I just need to go ahead and do it some day. Who knows, he might like them.
I'd also like to try a rutabaga. That's something I've never tasted, but think I might like. I've never tried parsnips, either, but if they taste anything like carrots, I'd love them.


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Old 12-01-2006, 10:34 PM   #20
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Thanks, everyone, for your ideas! I tried to parboil the first batch, boil for 10 minutes, I think I either cut the potatoes too thin or boiled them too long, because they were cooked and started fallling apart. Okay, Plan B - I washed another batch, quartered, tossed with olive oil and spices and whole garlic cloves and onions and baked at 450 degrees F for about 30 minutes and then broiled for about 5 minutes. They were good! Thanks!
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