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Old 04-19-2009, 08:24 AM   #11
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they're my favorites...........you can preserve their longevity by wrapping them in foil and placing them in the fridge.........it truly worked for me and this was a hint from an article on them
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Old 04-19-2009, 08:48 AM   #12
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they're my favorites...........you can preserve their longevity by wrapping them in foil and placing them in the fridge.........it truly worked for me and this was a hint from an article on them
I just might try that technique! Although the pantyhose thing sounds like something I would do.
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Old 04-19-2009, 05:19 PM   #13
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this sounds like a great technique........let us know how it works out........the onions we get in Kazahsthan are so strong that you'll cry your eyes out......I'd kill to have them propagate vidalias...........
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Old 04-19-2009, 07:12 PM   #14
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I love Vidalias. I buy 10 pounds from the Shriners every year. I now have Texas 1015's, but won't buy any Peruvian or Mexican sweet onions. Who knows what they irrigate with?
I've read that blind taste tests show 1015's to be sweeter. They surely don't have the snob appeal, or the cool look of a Vidalia.
1015's are named that because they must be planted by October 15th.
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Old 04-20-2009, 12:00 PM   #15
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Hello from the Vidalia Onion Committee in Vidalia, GA! Today is actually the official season start date. I've talked to our farmers all morning, and they are busy getting onions out of the field and into the packing shed where they'll be readied for the retail stores! Exciting!

Vidalia® Onions have a higher water and sugar content than regular storage onions, making their shelf life shorter and causing them to be susceptible to bruising. Therefore, they must be handled with care by the grower, the retailer and you, the consumer.

My favorite way to store them is to wrap them individually in paper towels and place them in the veggie bin in your fridge (with the vents closed). You will lose a few, but many will keep for months. Buy a big bag at the end of the season and you should have some through the holidays!

The key to preserving Vidalias® is to keep them cool and dry. Here are some more tips:

Store them:

• In the refrigerator crisper, wrapped separately in paper towels or newspaper.
• In the legs of clean, sheer pantyhose. Tie a knot between each Vidalia® and cut above the knot when you want one. Hang in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area.
• On elevated racks or screens, not touching and in a cool place.
• Vidalia® Onions can be chopped and dried in the oven. Use the lowest setting and remove when thoroughly dry but not brown.
Store at room temperature in airtight containers.
• Vidalia® Onions can also be frozen. Chop and place on a cookie sheet in the freezer. When frozen, remove and place in freezer containers or bags, and seal. Remove the amount you want as needed.
• Freeze whole. Jumbos can be peeled, washed, cored and dropped into a plastic bag. Once frozen, they can be removed like ice cubes.
Whole frozen Vidalias® can be baked.
(Freezing changes the onion’s texture, so frozen onions should
be used for cooking only).

Hope that helps answer your questions, and THANK YOU ALL for being Vidalia fans!

W. Brannen, Executive Director of the Vidalia Onion Committee
VidaliaOnion.org
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Old 04-20-2009, 12:08 PM   #16
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Thanks for dropping by "Onion Man".........
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Old 04-20-2009, 12:12 PM   #17
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I'm a guy so is there a particular size or style that works best? Do I need to wear them for awhile first so they are *used* or can they be used new?
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Old 04-20-2009, 12:33 PM   #18
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I'm a guy so is there a particular size or style that works best? Do I need to wear them for awhile first so they are *used* or can they be used new?
If you have jumbo onions, queen size panty hose might be in order.
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Old 04-20-2009, 01:46 PM   #19
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What a nice thing that W. Brannen stopped by with some info and tips.
Thank-You!
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Old 05-08-2009, 07:24 PM   #20
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As I was flipping through May's Southern Living today, I saw a Vidalia onion recipe that I have got to try. It is a Rustic Vidalia Onion Tart (I think that's right). Anyway, the recipe basically just calls for a pre-made pie crust, sauteed Vidalia onions, and gruyere cheese. Then the sides of the crust are folded up to form a rustic tart shell and then baked. What could be better---Vidalia onions and gruyere cheese??? Has anyone already done this?
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