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Old 12-29-2004, 01:02 PM   #11
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Can you just chop up the garlic and store as is? Wouldn't botulism not be an issue then? Just curious. I see lots of people do this with their garlic. I think you loose some of the flavor, but it sure seems convienent.
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Old 12-29-2004, 01:19 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by htc
Can you just chop up the garlic and store as is? Wouldn't botulism not be an issue then? Just curious. I see lots of people do this with their garlic. I think you loose some of the flavor, but it sure seems convienent.
Yes. The oil is the culprit. It creates an anaerobic (airless) environment that is perfect for botulism.

If you chop and store in fridge, it'll dry out. If you freeze it it'll last a bit longer
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Old 12-29-2004, 01:23 PM   #13
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I store my sliced, peeled ginger in dry sherry - will keep for months and months unrefrigerated.

Chopped garlic should just be used as needed.
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Old 12-29-2004, 02:26 PM   #14
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jennyema, then why is it ok to eat sun dried tomato packed in oil? Wouldn't the same thing happen? Or is it just the interaction with garlic?
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Old 12-29-2004, 04:16 PM   #15
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it's the interaction with the garlic - There's lots of info out there - go to google and type in

garlic, botulism
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Old 12-30-2004, 01:19 AM   #16
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even with all of the warnings and info, i know several people that store chopped garlic in oil in the fridge (without preservatives) for a few weeks at a time, and suffered no ill effects.
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Old 12-30-2004, 06:03 AM   #17
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Bucky, you're right - but it is a 'roll of the dice', just as only 1 in - I think - 30,000 eggs has salmonella bacteria; but I sure don't want to be that one!
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Old 12-30-2004, 03:14 PM   #18
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Any commercially prepared fresh product in oil will probably* have been acidified or prepared by boiling or pressure to eliminate the risk of botulism.

The higher the acid content in a fresh product stored in oil, the lower the risk of botulism. Tomatoes are naturally acidic, whereas garlic and peppers and basil, for example, are not. That's why you see most of the attention drawn to garlic. Also, botulism spores come from soil, so things grown in the ground (eg, garlic) are more likely sources.

Bucky -- there are lots of people who do this, sure. But they are taking a big chance. The fact is that they are risking botulism poisoning by doing it. Like M has said, it's a roll of the dice and chances are they won't get sick, but since Botulism is so incredibly hideous and so super easy to avoid ... IMO: why take the chance?



* There have been cases of botulism with improperly prepared commercial products -- Vichyssoise comes to mind -- but they are very rare. Almost all incidents of botulism poisoning come from home prep or restaurants.
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Old 12-30-2004, 11:02 PM   #19
 
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This thread is cause for some very serious thought...and I'd like to thank Jennyma for bringing this up for our information and edification...the things you don't know, that can kill ya, too!

Would love to see more of this!

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Old 12-30-2004, 11:16 PM   #20
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yes, thanks jennyema, and everyone for their contributions. i never pre-chop and store garlic anyway. i mean, it's not very hard to pluck a coupla cloves, smash, skin and chop them. probably would take me the same or less time than trying to find a jar in the fridge.
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