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Old 05-26-2017, 11:31 AM   #21
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Pasta Water Tip

don't remember from which TV chef I got this -

so you don't forget to save some pasta water -

while you are waiting for your pasta to cook...

put a (heat safe) bowl or measuring cup directly under your colander/sieve in the sink.

So when you drain your pasta - - -

presto, bingo you have your water!

works for me!
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Old 05-26-2017, 11:56 AM   #22
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America's Test Kitchen/Cook's Country puts a measuring cup in a big strainer and just pours the water and pasta into the strainer. You end up with drained pasta and a cup of pasta water.
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Old 05-26-2017, 12:46 PM   #23
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Thanks Andy, perhaps that is where I got it from, I still don't remember. But I do know if I leave the cup inside the strainer a lot of the pasta falls into the cup as well and I have to fish it out.
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Old 05-26-2017, 01:18 PM   #24
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Any of you folks use a pasta pot that has a basket/strainer? With some straight, thin pasta you may loose a little through the strainer holes, but you won't loose much. You will have a whole pot of pasta water left to take out as much as you like at your leisure.
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Old 05-26-2017, 01:38 PM   #25
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The recipe I use for fettuccine Alfredo says to take the pasta out of the pot with tongs and drop it into the butter (or butter and cream if using that version) so you get some of the water clinging to the pasta. The recipe specifies not to drain the pasta. That method also leaves an entire pot of pasta water.
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Old 05-26-2017, 01:41 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
The recipe I use for fettuccine Alfredo says to take the pasta out of the pot with tongs and drop it into the butter (or butter and cream if using that version) so you get some of the water clinging to the pasta. The recipe specifies not to drain the pasta. That method also leaves an entire pot of pasta water.
That's what I do, with all kinds of pasta.

I have a large stockpot and a smaller stainless steel Dutch oven that have strainer baskets, but it takes so much water to fill them enough to make pasta that I never use them.
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Old 05-26-2017, 01:47 PM   #27
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A lot of chefs when doing 'Italian' pasta, remove the pasta from the water with tongs or a spider like basket. Ergo you have all your pasta water to hand. Perhaps it is a North American thing to 'drain'?
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Old 06-14-2017, 02:14 PM   #28
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Alfredo is not an Italian invention. You will never find it anywhere in a restaurant in Italy except for touristy places that cater to Americans. Same with spaghetti and meat balls. That's another American invention. Having said that cook and eat what you like!
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Old 06-14-2017, 05:13 PM   #29
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Actually, Alfredo's origin is fairly well documented as a restaurant in Rome by a chef named Alfredo. Feel free to investigate.
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Old 06-14-2017, 05:14 PM   #30
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Spaghetti and meatballs are also both Italian. The idea of serving them together is an American one.
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"Authentic" Fettuccine Alfredo Twenty or twenty-five years ago, a woman I was dating taught me how to make fettuccine Alfredo. I was just learning how to cook and she was much more adept. She gave me a basic recipe using butter, cheese and heavy cream. I've been making it that way, with and without additions, since then. I subsequently learned that recipe wasn't authentic as the original recipe was butter, cheese and pasta cooking water. I've never tried to make it this way until today. I got a pasta maker for a Christmas gift and have used it a couple of times. Earlier this week, I defrosted a disk of pasta dough leftover from another effort and my GD and I made fresh fettuccine to go with Alfredo sauce for dinner the other night. I made that recipe with cream as I wanted to experiment with the original recipe when it wasn't a family meal. I reserved a small portion of pasta dough for the experiment. Today's lunch was the experiment. I rolled out some fettuccine noodles and cooked them in a smaller than usual amount of water to ensure I had a starchy enough liquid. Meanwhile I melted some butter and readied some parm reg. I drained the noodles and saved some of the water, added the pasta to the butter, added the cheese and some of the water. Everything got tossed together. What started out looking like a watery mess came together to create a nice creamy sauce for the pasta. A little salt and pepper and I had a fantastic lunch. First of all, fresh made and cut pasta is noticeably different and better than dry. Second, the flavor of the cheese stands out more in the absence of the extra fat from the cream. As the pasta cooled on my plate, the sauce thickened. I probably could have added a little more water. On the whole it was a very good experience. I'll have to experiment on the family next time. GD is lactose intolerant so the absence of cream will be better for her. I think my next pasta experiment will be to make lasagna noodles. I just have to figure out the right thickness. 3 stars 1 reviews
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