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Old 01-11-2005, 01:46 PM   #1
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glutinous rice

What is glutinous rice? I am making a chinese style sticky rice and have no idea what glutinous rice is. Is it the same as long grain white rice?

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Old 01-11-2005, 02:04 PM   #2
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??? I'm interested in knowing too!
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Old 01-11-2005, 02:06 PM   #3
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Glutinous means sticky. I think there is a special type of rice for this dish, but I can't remember the name of it.
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Old 01-11-2005, 02:07 PM   #4
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short grain rice is usually used for sticky, or sushi rice.

and glutinous does mean sticky, because my glutinous maximus is always stuck to a chair...
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Old 01-11-2005, 02:10 PM   #5
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lol bucky!

Yes, sushi rice would be glutinous rice - or any other short-grain rice - I buy sushi rice for such recipes.
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Old 01-11-2005, 04:36 PM   #6
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Glutinous Rice:

A virtually round grain rice, it does not contain gluten, but exudes a great deal of
starch which makes the grains stick together.

Frequently eaten by the Chineese and the Japaneese because they falsely believe that
it is easier to eat with chopsticks because it sticks togerther in a lump. Or perhaps
because it grows better in the climates that they have.

There is an unhusked black variety sometimes known as Nanking rice. This is the
same thing, but being unhusked, does not release the starch in the same way.

In terms of taste, it is pretty ordinary.

Personally, I would not bother with it, having tasted it. Just use good basmatti rice,
and for a chineese meal, do not wash it. If you can use chopsticks, you can eat this
rice by the grain. And it is MUCH healthier than the glutinous variety.
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Old 01-11-2005, 09:00 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
short grain rice is usually used for sticky, or sushi rice.

and glutinous does mean sticky, because my glutinous maximus is always stuck to a chair...
You never fail to crack me up :D
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Old 01-11-2005, 09:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkstream
Glutinous Rice:

A virtually round grain rice, it does not contain gluten, but exudes a great deal of
starch which makes the grains stick together.

Frequently eaten by the Chineese and the Japaneese because they falsely believe that
it is easier to eat with chopsticks because it sticks togerther in a lump. Or perhaps
because it grows better in the climates that they have.

There is an unhusked black variety sometimes known as Nanking rice. This is the
same thing, but being unhusked, does not release the starch in the same way.

In terms of taste, it is pretty ordinary.

Personally, I would not bother with it, having tasted it. Just use good basmatti rice,
and for a chineese meal, do not wash it. If you can use chopsticks, you can eat this
rice by the grain. And it is MUCH healthier than the glutinous variety.
Thank you, basmatti rice I can get here.
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Old 01-11-2005, 09:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amber
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
short grain rice is usually used for sticky, or sushi rice.

and glutinous does mean sticky, because my glutinous maximus is always stuck to a chair...
You never fail to crack me up :D

leave it to bucky
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Old 01-12-2005, 07:40 AM   #10
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While sushi rice is sticky, glutinous rice is far stickier. I believe glutinous rice is available in Asian stores in the U.S. because I was able to buy it there in the Fremont area in California 3 years ago. While taste for taste it's like ordinary rice, the sticky texture of glutinous rice is really what one is going for. Whether whole or ground up into powder, Asians use it in many applications, for example:

for savory meals:
- machang (seasoned sticky rice mixed with chicken, pork, and mushrooms wrapped in fragrant leaves shaped into pyramid cones then steamed)
- kiampong (chinese version of biryani)
- whole chicken stuffed with chinese paella

for dessert:
- Filipino biko or sweet rice cakes topped with rich dark coconut paste
- Filipino sapin-sapin or colorful multi-layered sweet cake topped with toasted cocunut
- Thai coconut sticky rice usually served with mango
- Chinese buchi (toasted sesame seed puffs)

Strange that the short-grain sushi rice we buy here is referred to as Calrose or California rice or Japanese rice.

I would normally not think to substitute glutinous rice with sushi rice as the latter won't be sticky enough. Plus sushi rice is imported and much more expensive than the ubiquitous glutinous rice (at least where I live now). :)
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