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Old 03-30-2015, 07:55 PM   #1
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Grits got runny with cheese

Usually when I make grits I just make em plain with a little salt and figure that the person eating them will figure out how to gussy them up as a butter or gravy delivery system.

This time I was asked to make cheesy grits so I obliged but had a consistency problem. I'm wondering why.

I made them as usual and cooked until they were pretty thick (like soft mashed potatoes - you can turn over the spoon and they stick for a time) but then after adding cheese they became quite runny. I added fresh shaved parm and a little cheddar to the grits and stirred until melted.


What did I do wrong? Why did nice thick, eat with a fork grits become runny with the addition of some cheese? Bowls and spoons were needed to eat them. Any ideas?

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Old 03-30-2015, 08:31 PM   #2
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How hot were the grits when added the cheese?

Cheese should thicken them up. But if the grits were really hot the cheese might have separated... Was it clumpy?
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Old 03-30-2015, 08:34 PM   #3
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Sounds like they broke. Too much fat added too quickly. I'll post a T&T for cheesy grits.

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Old 03-30-2015, 08:53 PM   #4
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They were really hot and no clumps. Very smooth. I suppose it's possible the cheese broke but I'm not sure how I'd know? There was no visible floating fat....
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Old 03-30-2015, 09:02 PM   #5
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I'm a little fuzzy on the exact chemistry. Something like this... the cereal absorbed water during cooking but wasn't set. Fat was added displacing the water in the cereal causing it to run out.

Try this one out. Works every time for me. The baking soda causes the grits to rise a bit and take on a fluffy texture.

Baked Cheesy Grits


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Old 03-30-2015, 11:32 PM   #6
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I'm lousy at making grits.

See .40, once again you can see how you've been missed! I have your always clear recipe all printed up, and I fear no more.
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Old 03-31-2015, 06:40 AM   #7
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What grain is used to make grits?


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Old 03-31-2015, 07:38 AM   #8
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Quote:
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What grain is used to make grits?


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Corn Charlie. It is more of a Southern Dish. Northerners don't make it too much. You would have to travel down South and get them at a restaurant, then fall in love with them to want to eat them again. I happen to love them. But a box of them last me forever so I don't buy them.
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Old 03-31-2015, 09:10 AM   #9
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Cheese hates heat and should always be added off heat and when whatever you are adding it to is not too hot (bechemel, mashed potatoes, grits, etc).

If it's too hot the cheese will break. You might not see the gritty pieces in grits but that would explain the runniness
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Old 03-31-2015, 01:15 PM   #10
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Cheese hates heat and should always be added off heat and when whatever you are adding it to is not too hot (bechemel, mashed potatoes, grits, etc).

If it's too hot the cheese will break. You might not see the gritty pieces in grits but that would explain the runniness
Jenny, would Parm cheese have a lot of oil in it? With most of the water having dried out due to aging, I wouldn't think there would be much else left except dried milk.
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