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Old 07-26-2010, 02:43 PM   #1
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KitchenAid Pasta Press

I recently acquired the Pasta Press attachment for my KA. KitchenAid Stand Mixer Pasta Press Attachment | Williams-Sonoma

I've used it a couple of times and while I have been able to get a usable pasta out, it turns out rubbery when cooked?

Anyone else have one of these gadgets? Success stories? Compatible dough recipe?

.40
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Old 07-26-2010, 02:48 PM   #2
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Can you post your dough recipe? There are lots on the site here that work well. I can help you find links.
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Old 07-26-2010, 02:54 PM   #3
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I tried the following one most recently.....

Egg Pasta
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Serving Size: 6
Yield: 1 pound

Ingredients:

2-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
3 eggs
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon lukewarm water

Directions:

Stand Mixer:
Place the eggs, salt, oil and water into the mixer bowl. Beat well.

Add the flour slowly. Using the dough hook continue mixing until the dough is smooth and elastic.

Cover with a bowl or towel and let rest for 10 to 15 minutes.
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Old 07-26-2010, 04:25 PM   #4
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Sounds like the dough was kneaded a little too much. I've been using the KA's recipe from the book and have been happy with it. I knead it about 5 minutes. And stop at the point where it's sticky, but not feel wet. If it needs an additional flour dusting, it won't be too much.
It seems to work in my favor if the flour and beaten eggs are used at room temp. Keep a sifter with a 1/2 cup of AP flour handy. Make it up the night before to keep it pliable enough for raviolis.

You can also add Semolina flour to the AP. Half and half.

Welcome to DC! :)

Munky.
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Old 07-26-2010, 04:44 PM   #5
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I'll see about getting some 00 cake flour or Semolina from the grocery. Thanks for the advice.
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Old 07-27-2010, 01:26 PM   #6
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fortyc, is that the pasta extruder? I haven't used the KA one, but the one I did, gave me tough pasta, no matter what recipe or flour I used. Did not like it at the end of the day.

OTOH, my Imperia, hand crank pasta roller, I get great pasta every time. Just not round.
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Old 07-27-2010, 02:56 PM   #7
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Ditto what ChefJune said about the hand crank pasta machine. Mine makes lovely tender pasta every time with basically the same recipe you posted.

I'm guessing over working the dough is the culprit too. Good luck fixing it up.
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Old 09-07-2010, 04:26 PM   #8
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What kind of pasta (shape) are you trying to make?
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Old 09-07-2010, 08:44 PM   #9
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I've only tried it twice. 1st time was hollow spaghetti. 2nd time was ziti.

The hollow spaghetti was actually almost edible. The ziti was terrible. Mrs .40 has suggested that I leave it in the box for now.

.40
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Old 09-07-2010, 10:58 PM   #10
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Mrs. 40 is a very wise woman. May be you should listen to her.
From my book:
-------Pasta-------


Dry pasta and fresh pasta, what’s the difference?

Dry pasta is commercially made in the shapes of Spaghetti, Penne, Farfalle, Tortiglioni, Maccheroni, ziti, bucatini (hollow spaghetti) etc. and it is usually made with durum semolina flour, and practically impossible to make at home, as it requires specific heavy machines. Italian brands are usually sold in boxes of 500 grams (17.5 oz). What supports this pasta is the sauce that you put on top. The sauce is the main and most important element.

Dry egg pasta is also commercially and satisfactorily available or it can be made at home. It is usually sold as “tagliatelle all’uovo” (egg noodles).

Fresh egg pasta is essential to the making of Ravioli, (tortelli, tortelloni, tortellini, agnolotti, anolini, cappelletti, panzerotti, casoncelli, etc. They all belong to the ravioli family. They get their names from specific regions of Italy). In my hometown of Brescia, ravioli are called Casoncelli; in Liguria they are called Panzerotti, in Emilia Romagna they are called Anolini.

It doesn’t really matter what you call them, the stuffing is the important part, and most ravioli are simply topped with melted butter. You go to a lot of trouble to stuff these little things. You certainly don’t want to conceal the taste under a heavy sauce.
Ravioli are the best way to use leftovers (I will never get tired of saying it). They are a little time consuming, but with what you save in ingredients, you will quickly recover the cost of the pasta machine. When making ravioli, it is worth your time to make as many as your filling will allow. Any left over egg pasta can be used to make noodles. I find ravioli making therapeutic.
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