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Old 07-01-2007, 03:14 PM   #21
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Great idea! Thanks Amy!!
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Old 07-01-2007, 03:37 PM   #22
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Someone may have already suggested this, but it is important to drain the ricotta, well. I put it into a cheesecloth lined sieve, in the refrigerator, usually overnight.
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Old 07-01-2007, 03:43 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Essiebunny
Someone may have already suggested this, but it is important to drain the ricotta, well. I put it into a cheesecloth lined sieve, in the refrigerator, usually overnight.

I wonder if it would work to wrap the ricotta in cheese cloth and spin it in the salad spinner? That way, you wouldn't have to remember the night before to start it draining.
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Old 07-01-2007, 05:08 PM   #24
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I have to admit that I was always a fan of regular lasagne noodles. But after using the Barilla brand "no-cook" noodles, I've had a hard time going back unless I'm making a specialty lasagne that doesn't call for a lot of sauce.

This pasta has consistenly produced fabulous lasgane - always firm, but tender, never soggy.

Although I do definitely agree with everyone who's said that you do have to allow baked pasta dishes - especially lasagne - to "rest" awhile after baking. Twenty minutes at the very very least. Just like when you allow a roast turkey or beef to rest before carving, many/most of the "juices" need time to soak/redistribute into the meat/dish.
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Old 07-01-2007, 08:39 PM   #25
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In my family, we always add raw eggs to the ricotta cheese @ 1 egg per pound of cheese. Ricotta cheese is very watery and tends to weep when it's heated. Adding the raw egg helps to bind it. The only other suggestion is to be certain you've drained all the fat from the beef, before you add it to the pan.
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Old 07-01-2007, 08:43 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I wonder if it would work to wrap the ricotta in cheese cloth and spin it in the salad spinner? That way, you wouldn't have to remember the night before to start it draining.
If you don't want to wait overnight....you could put the cheese into a clean, new stocking...and wring it out, pressing as firmly as possible to get out all the moisture. I've never done the straining step for lasagna, only for canolis.
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Old 07-01-2007, 08:47 PM   #27
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Mrs. C., here's my Italian family's lasagna recipe. The sauce is nice and thick and the ricotta mixture contains eggs, which several members have mentioned. It's delicious and cuts out of the pan like cake. There's never any left when I make a pan of it.
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Old 07-07-2007, 01:34 PM   #28
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Thank you all for your help. I will try it again soon!

Thanks for the recipe Katie...sounds delicious!!!
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Old 02-20-2008, 10:39 PM   #29
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such an oldpost but i'll try,

i always only cook my noodles like 2/3 done so that when i cook in over later they finish cookin with some of the moisture with the sauce and then let it sit before cutting, never soupy and then the noodles arent mushy either
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Old 02-21-2008, 12:52 AM   #30
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I never boil the noodles, I let them absorb the moisture from my sauce. You were using jarred sauce, so its consistency should have been just fine. You might also try mixing in an egg or two and a cup of mozz with the ricotta and layer in order ... sauce on bottom, lasagna sheets (I like Barilla), ricotta mixture, more mozz, sauce and layer on up, finishing with sauce and cheese. Be sure to bake long enough, at least one hour, and allow to rest. I worked at an Italian restaurant in college (UP Michigan) and each lasagna dish was served in its own Corning casserole baker ... a huge square smothered in sauce and cheese and baked until melted and swimming. Okay, that doesn't sound as appetizing as it was, but it's pure heaven. Maybe that's the memory of a starving college student?
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