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Old 07-03-2006, 12:58 AM   #1
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Curry

Does anybody know anything about curry (general information), spices and seasonings, ratios of those seasonings for different types of curry...

Anything would be appreciated.

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Old 07-03-2006, 01:19 AM   #2
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Man you've come to the right place, My suggestion is to just buy curry pastes and powder. It's one of those things (like canned tomatoes) which just work ready made. Here are two simple curries I make with Curry Powder. I'm into Ayam powder atm, but Keens make a mean powder too.

Chicken Curry:
1 Red Onion
1 Clove crushed garlic
1 Cup Corn Kernels
500g Diced Chicken (Thighs are great for curry)
500gms small potatoes, cut in half. (About the same size as the chicken)
1 Cup chicken stock
1/2 Cup cocunut milk (Optional)
2 Tbsp Curry Powder

Cook onions and garlic over a medium heat until soft.
Add curry powder and cook until fragrant (This is a must for all currys)
In a seperate pan, brown chicken quickly
Add chicken to onion mix, and rest of the ingrediants.
Reduce the liquid until it's thick and potatoes are cooked. I boil the mixr reasonably hard for about 20 minutes.

Beef Curry:
As above but, swap chicken for beef, chicken stock for beef stock, replace cocunut milk with 1 Tbspn Tomato Paste. This adds a richness that compliments the darker meat. And add some green beans.

I've made curry paste from scratch, and I must say, the pre packaged stuff is honestly just as good. If using a paste in the above recipes, use a lot more of it, it's less potent than powder in most cases, but you must still toast it, untill fragrant. I can't stress enough how important it is, to release the aromatics in curry.

If your curry is too hot, add less next time, you wont notice less flavour.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curry

That's a great article about curry that might answer some of your questions.
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Old 07-03-2006, 04:04 AM   #3
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huh cool. maybe you can look over a recipe i found? I had a bit of difficulty with it, but that may soon resolved once i try it again.

16 oz. Ground Beef
1 Onion Diced
5 Chili Peppers Diced
2 Bay Leaves Diced
2 Tbsp. Curry Powder
2 Slices Ginger Crushed
3 Cloves Garlic Crushed
1/2 C. Tomato Sauce

Oil a pot and fry diced bay leaves and chili peppers, then add onions and cook on low heat until caramelized. Add ground beef and cook until not visibly raw, add curry powder and tomato sauce, cook on medium low for 20 to 30 minutes. Add Garlic and Ginger and cook for several more minutes and salt as needed.

I'm pretty sure that curry is a sauce based dish made from reducing down the liquid that is used to make the curry, but with this recipe, it seems like there wouldn't be all that much liquid to begin with, indeed when i tried the liquid that came out of the beef and the tomato sauce didn't amoun to much liquid, or am i missing something? I could always try a different recipe, i dunno if this recipes all that rustworthy.
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Old 07-03-2006, 03:34 PM   #4
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ah. this is interesting, i don't htink its physically possible to look at every recipe here. But i guess thats a good thing. I'll be sure to peruse and try a few. O and can a mod or admin take care of my little double post up there =b.
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Old 07-03-2006, 06:10 PM   #5
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Keep in mind that there are literally hundreds (if not more) of different types of curries based in several different cuisines. It would really be impossible to give you "general" information about them on an internet forum.

If I were you & were interested in curries, I'd not only search the web, but also perhaps pick up a few inexpensive Indian, Thai, Carribean, &/or Indonesian-style cookbooks. Most have glossaries with in-depth explanations of ingredients & different curry spice mixes.

A little research will lead to some interesting cooking & eating.
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Old 07-04-2006, 03:07 AM   #6
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I have to say that in all my years of travelling and eating curries all round the world, I've never eaten a curry with minced beef in it!
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Old 07-10-2006, 10:47 AM   #7
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Hi Ishbel, actually Keema is very popular in Indian cuisine and our Keema (minced or ground beef) is made with curry spices.

I love to cook that with some peas in it.

The recipe that Chausibao posted is for Keema and it's definitely an Indo/Pak preparation. I have never heard of Indonesian's or Thai or any others making a ground beef curry.

Curry powder (Indian style) would be fine for this recipe. I normally roast whole cumin seeds (1 tsp), corrainder seeds (1 tsp), black pepper (4 whole ones), cloves (2), 1 small stick of cinnamon and 2 cardamom pods to make my masala (or curry concoction). It can get more involved but these spices are sufficient to get the flavors in a curry. Add to that a little tumeric and some red chili powder and paprika and you made yourself a curry spice mix. I know I make it sound easy but it is indeed easy if you have these spices in your pantry. If not it's easier to buy curry powder especially if you only cook this type of food once in a while.

Also some tips I can give you about making a really nice keema (ground beef) curry is to ensure that the onions are almost browned and then the spices and tomatoes are added and cooked until almost a paste. Next add the keema and let it cook covered (break the lumps) for atleast 30 minutes. Now using elbow grease saute the beef until it's nicely browned. I don't like watery looking keema curry. To get a nice taste you have to use elbow grease.

All the best.
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Old 07-10-2006, 11:03 AM   #8
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Beef curries are almost unheard of in our 'Indian' restaurants - don't quite know why, as most of the Chefs are not Indian, but Pakistani or Bangladeshi
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Old 07-10-2006, 11:09 AM   #9
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I hadn't been accustomed to anything Indian using beef either, however according to Yakuta, beef can be eaten regularly in some northern part of India, among the Muslims. It is the Hindi who do not eat beef and among the region with Muslims, pork is instead forbidden.

After she told me that I tried curried meatballs with minced beef, they were quite tasty
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Old 07-10-2006, 11:20 AM   #10
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Actually the keema curry you get in Indian restaurants (and you get them in India and also in US) are made with ground Lamb since the restaurants cater to both Hindus and Muslims and Hindus are a majority so they have to adjust since beef is strictly off limits for them.

I make my curry with beef because I like the taste and I am not a huge lamb fan (especially here in the US) because it's rather gamey in taste.
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