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Old 08-24-2008, 01:02 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by velochic View Post
My dh is Armenian. I don't cook a lot of Armenian dishes, but I've found this online cookbook to have any recipes one would need. If I need help with a recipe, dh can call his sister back in Istanbul. Since dh was born and raised in Turkey, a lot of the dishes that his mother made/sister makes has a Turkish influence. Still, though, a lot of the dishes that you listed, dh says are popular throughout the Middle East, and some he had never even heard of (Zahtar pizza, Pellmini and Troopka, for example, dh has no idea what they are). They probably are Russian influenced, as Armenia was formerly a Soviet state. Manti is actually Turkish/Middle Eastern. It is extremely labor intensive to make. People make it at home only for the most celebrated of holidays. Börek is just dough stuffed with various fillings. I make the cigar Börek all the time at home. Much easier than the folded Börek. I order my dough (Yufka) online, but you can use phyllo dough, too. The dolma are just a rice/meat mixture wrapped in grape leaves and saturated in olive oil... served cold (and I think they are disgusting ). I can get specific recipes, but for so many of these things, they are very specific to family recipes that can vary. Try that online cookbook and you should find plenty of TNT recipes there.

(The pizza is Lahmacun, and although it's popular in Turkey and throughout the middle east the Armenians claim it as "their" food. I eat a lot of lahmacun when we go back to Istanbul to visit family and there are several different ways to make it.)

Here is my quick and easy Lahmacun recipe:

Flour tortillas
finely diced green peppers (they use sweet banana peppers in the authentic recipe)
grated onion, juice included
a couple tablespoons of red pepper paste
a couple of tablespoons of double concentrated tomato paste
1 lb. of ground lamb, very finely minced
chopped cilantro
ground sumac

Mix everything into a spreadable kind of paste. Spread thinly on the tortillas. Bake in a hot oven until the meat is cooked through. Sometimes I finish it off under the broiler. Add additional cilantro and the ground sumac.
Thank you, thank you, Velochic. Copied & saved. I played around, & came up with my own concoction (till I try yours). Sprayed some flour tortillas w water, browned ground beef, onions & chopped green pepper & added parsley & chopped tomatoes. Spread some tomato paste on the tortillas, topped with the mixture & baked till warm. Squeezed some lemon juice over all & served with sour cream on the side. Will have to give your version a go.
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Old 08-24-2008, 01:04 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by deelady View Post
The zahtar pizza also spelled zaatar is prob just a basic flat bread pizza topped with zahtar which is an herb mixture of: thyme,(most popular,can also use a different herb) sumac, sesame seeds, and salt. Its wonderful with pita bread dipped in olive oil then also in the zahtar, nice lght refreshing snack. but I have often also used it as like a rub for meats or to season ust about any dish!
Sounds yummy, deelady. Will see is I can track down those herbs & spices. The armenian string cheese sounds delish. Thank you!
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Old 08-24-2008, 01:09 PM   #13
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Amy:

You've quite a melange of dishes at that bakery. There's more to it that just Armenian.foods. I'd like to spend some time there. My mouth is watering just thinking about it.

The pelmeni is a Russian ravioli.

The Kibbe is a Near Eastern meatloaf at home in Armenian and other kitchens.

What many folks refer to as Armenian pizza is what I know as lamejun. It is delicious and always a favorite. My mom made it very well. I haven't made it yet. My sister makes it on pita. I had suggested using tortillas to her but she hasn't tried it yet. The Armenian markets here sell it by the dozen.

Manti, or munti, or however you spell it is another favorite of mine. When properly made, it's little pockets of dough filled with a spiced meat mixture and baked then cooked in a broth flavored with mint and finished with yogurt. The quick version is to brown ground beef with onion and garlic and use small shells pasta in the flavored broth.

When my mom made dolma (stuffed vegetables) they were stuffed with rice, lamb, tomato etc. and cooked in a broth. Mom would stuff zucchini, red and green tomatoes, cucumbers, eggplants and peppers. Sarma is similar except the filling is wrapped in grape leaves or cabbage.

The beoreks as I know them are turnovers. Think empanada. They are usually cheese or spinach or a combination. Some folks make them in phyllo dough in a baking dish, layering the phyllo and adding the filling the topping with more phyllo.

I've never heard of troopka.
Thanks, Andy. It's a pretty interesting restaurant - bakery & pizzaria. Think the plave used to be a bakery. All the dishes sound yummy. Tried to stop by a few times (on a Sunday) & try their authentic versions, but they were either closed, or I had too many pkgs to carry. Would love some authentic recipes, if you can get hold of them.

Thanks again, all.

P.S. Have a feeling Troopka might be a Russian pastry/dish. Must explore some more.
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Old 08-24-2008, 01:56 PM   #14
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It does sond like a mixture of everything. The real Armenian would not make manty, as it is more of a midle eastern food. Troopka sounds like a russian word, probably something round, maybe kind of clsed on one end and filled with something. Like most etnic restaurants of former soviet union they all have a mixture of things and dishes from all over the place.
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Old 08-24-2008, 02:04 PM   #15
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...The real Armenian would not make manty, as it is more of a midle eastern food...

Interesting observation, my real Armenian parents and real Armenian relatives all made it and I still do.
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Old 08-24-2008, 02:22 PM   #16
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Ooooh, I'm so glad you saw this thread Charlie. Thought, perhaps ukraine and russian dishes (maybe some armeanian dishes) might have different takes on similar recipes.

Here is a yummy Manti pic - looks like dumplings & yogurt?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mant%C4%B1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Mant%C4%B1.jpg

Tell me what you think. TIA.

Andy, I drool when I read their menu. Will see if I can scan it & post.
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Old 08-24-2008, 03:35 PM   #17
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Ooooh, I'm so glad you saw this thread Charlie. Thought, perhaps ukraine and russian dishes (maybe some armeanian dishes) might have different takes on similar recipes.

Here is a yummy Manti pic - looks like dumplings & yogurt?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mant%C4%B1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Mant%C4%B1.jpg

Tell me what you think. TIA.

Andy, I drool when I read their menu. Will see if I can scan it & post.

Two comments about the photos you posted.

First, I've only ever seen the smaller version. No more than an inch or so long and browned in the oven before cooking them in broth.

Second, my family's version was always served in a chicken broth with the yogurt mixed into the broth to thicken it. I've never seen it 'dry' before.

Very interesting, live and learn.
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Old 08-25-2008, 04:45 PM   #18
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Interesting observation, my real Armenian parents and real Armenian relatives all made it and I still do.
Then most likely we are talking about a dish that has the same name, but most likely is a diferent dish all together. of course there is a chance that I do not know what I'm talkin about. i only was going to marry an Armenian girls, in a year that we dated I probably did not have chance to learn everything about Armenian food.
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Old 08-25-2008, 04:52 PM   #19
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As I mention above, what I thought of manty doesn't look anything like the picture. i ate Manty made by an Uzbeck woman and they were very big, well biger then a golf ball. They were twisted on the top almost looked like a big chocolate kisses candy. And they were steamed, not boiled or fried. I honestly do not remember what it was served with. Simply because there were a lot of foods served at the time.

But it doesn't change the fact that restartaunts could be serving mixture of diferent foods, from diferent reigion.
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Old 08-25-2008, 07:31 PM   #20
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Two comments about the photos you posted.

First, I've only ever seen the smaller version. No more than an inch or so long and browned in the oven before cooking them in broth.

Second, my family's version was always served in a chicken broth with the yogurt mixed into the broth to thicken it. I've never seen it 'dry' before.

Very interesting, live and learn.
Mmmm. That sounds good too!!!

The little ones he showed me were called Pelmeni. They were small, as you mentioned, about 1", & shaped like pefect little octagons? Maybe they used a Pelmini maker? Will try to find a pic, but I think you know the gizmo I mean -- where you lay the dough out & fill the indentations, & seal with more dough over the top.

Here's a pic:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelmeni
These remind me of what we call Kreplach)
(Except they were smaller)

Either way... I'm making a beeline to Andy's for dinner.
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