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Old 02-27-2006, 09:13 PM   #21
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You can fill it with lots of stuff. Sauerkraut, cottage cheese, sweet fillings (apple pie stuff, cherry pie stuff, etc) you get the idea. OR...you can just cut it into pieces, boil them and serve them with lots of butter, bacon and sour cream. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!
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Old 02-27-2006, 09:19 PM   #22
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Yummm....cherry pie filling...and drizzle a frosting over it...
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Old 02-28-2006, 05:30 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
No-no-no, it is Ukrainian pierogies (that are, by the way, called Vareniki)
Ah... Vareniki... I have heard of them, just didn't put two and two together!!


Angie, sweet filling will be great... we do the same thing with crepes, when there are extra crepes left after making our dinner crepes, we just throw in jams, whipped cream etc and make desserts out of them, and out...
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Old 02-28-2006, 09:17 AM   #24
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Looks like Pirogy comes from Polish. Everybody I talked to think that it wasn't used in Ukraine. Though I did not talk to anybody from Western Ukraine, that borders Poland, so it could be that they also use that term.
Alix, do you know where your Grandma was from?
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Old 02-28-2006, 10:07 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
Looks like Pirogy comes from Polish. Everybody I talked to think that it wasn't used in Ukraine. Though I did not talk to anybody from Western Ukraine, that borders Poland, so it could be that they also use that term.
Alix, do you know where your Grandma was from?
It is probably the same thing as Baklava (among many other delicacies from that region), it could be called Greek, just as well it could be also Turkish. They are geographically so close certain aspects of culinary tradition sort of mingle together.
Well... at the end of the day the most important thing is that they are good stuff...
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Old 02-28-2006, 10:51 AM   #26
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this was on food network the other day... and I never made it.. but I will soon. It looks VERY easy and delicious - just ignore the caesar salad part.

Pyrogies and Caesar Salad

EDIT NOTE: This recipe is on the FoodNetwork CANADA website
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Old 02-28-2006, 11:36 AM   #27
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Everything in this thread has looked great, except for one thing, true authentic pierogi dough would use a solid fat like butter or preferably lard. That being said, when we get together at Christmas to make them, we use oil.

(And a VERY similar recipe to Alix's - we use an egg AND a cup of water though)

As for the leftover dough, we never have that problem, my cousins just start looking for other things to use as fillings when there's dough left. Tomatos, jelly from the fridge, it really does get quite ugly sometimes... (probably has to do with all the beer and vodka)

We always make sure we don't bring any of the "special" pierogi home. My personal favorite is the mashed potato and cheese. My dad likes the kraut filled ones. Nobody on our side tends to care for the cheese filled.

John
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Old 03-03-2006, 12:12 PM   #28
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well, yesterday I made the recipe from the food network, and it was the first time I made them.... and they tasted really good.. but did not look all brown like that picture.. after I boiled them.. they were kinda soggy.. and I had to be VERY careful when I put them back into the pan with the onions or they would fall apart, so they were soft... ok guys so whats the secret so they are not like that. They were delicious and the dough was great, but I would like to have a better presentation... any hints???
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Old 03-03-2006, 12:21 PM   #29
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Well, I can't speak for the recipe you used as the dough looks like it would be a bit softer than the one I use...BUT...as a general rule you scoop them out as soon as they start to float. When they float, they're done. Would that help you think?

Ronjohn, LMAO at the vodka and beer bit. I can soooooo relate to that. We never have extra dough either, but that is because we just make smaller and smaller perohe til its used up and then toss in the bits to boil with everything else.

AND...as to the oil vs butter or lard, very true! My Babby (gramma) used to use melted butter in hot water and let it cool a bit before using. Got to be careful with that egg thing though! I just use oil because it is faster and easier. Dang I'm lazy!
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Old 03-03-2006, 03:17 PM   #30
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well, recipe said to boil them 4 minutes.. do you think that is to much?
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