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Old 01-29-2016, 11:01 AM   #1
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, TX.
Posts: 569
Red pepper paste(Mex)?

Have Y'all tried making dried pepper paste?

Nice article if you want to read.

Discover how to use whole dried chiles for more depth, flavor and nuance | OregonLive.com

Here, you can buy bags of dried red peppers at any local gas station. they' not hot but the usual prep is this..

put peppers in hot water till they get soft
add peppers with water to blender and blend,
strain.

If this is all you do, it's like eating dirt!

I think I'm missing the whole fry the peppers in a skillet idea.

Wont it get very oily if I fry the pepper paste in a pan?

I dont like much oil in my soups, and am afraid to add a big scoop of oily pepper paste to my Pasole.

Thanks, Eric Austin tx.

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Old 01-29-2016, 11:53 AM   #2
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Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,859
Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
Have Y'all tried making dried pepper paste?

Nice article if you want to read.

Discover how to use whole dried chiles for more depth, flavor and nuance | OregonLive.com

Here, you can buy bags of dried red peppers at any local gas station. they' not hot but the usual prep is this..

put peppers in hot water till they get soft
add peppers with water to blender and blend,
strain.

If this is all you do, it's like eating dirt!

I think I'm missing the whole fry the peppers in a skillet idea.

Wont it get very oily if I fry the pepper paste in a pan?

I dont like much oil in my soups, and am afraid to add a big scoop of oily pepper paste to my Pasole.
Yeah, you're missing a bunch of steps there You fry the pepper paste in order to get more flavor out of it. Some flavors are water-soluble and some are fat-soluble, so using both techniques makes the paste more flavorful. It's a little oily, but not "very" oily because you don't use a whole lot. It's similar to browning meat and veggies in some type of fat before adding seasonings and liquids to make a stew.
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Old 02-16-2016, 03:58 PM   #3
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Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Florida
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
Have Y'all tried making dried pepper paste?

Nice article if you want to read.

Discover how to use whole dried chiles for more depth, flavor and nuance | OregonLive.com

Here, you can buy bags of dried red peppers at any local gas station. they' not hot but the usual prep is this..

put peppers in hot water till they get soft
add peppers with water to blender and blend,
strain.

If this is all you do, it's like eating dirt!

I think I'm missing the whole fry the peppers in a skillet idea.

Wont it get very oily if I fry the pepper paste in a pan?

I dont like much oil in my soups, and am afraid to add a big scoop of oily pepper paste to my Pasole.

Thanks, Eric Austin tx.
Hey there, dried pepper can be a great way to save space, meaning you can make batches at any given time. I fry roast them in just a bit of coconut oil. (I use Coconut oil due to it's properties-it doesn't go rancid as some other oils in high heat or within a certain time period.) This fry roasting process helps to bring out the flavor and gives them that roasted taste and fragrance LOL. If using hot peppers, be ready to sneeze or cough :-) Once that is done, there are a few ways to prep. You can process them down to a semi course or fine grind, and depending upon if you want a dry powder or make into a paste of sorts.
If drying powder, grind fine or course, put into a air tight jar and put in refrigerator to last a long period of time, although it does not have to be refrigerated.
However, if you are making a paste... put the processed (course or fine) pepper in a pot, add your flavors-such as fresh grated garlic or ginger or even cumin then add some salt, some water and a touch of vinegar and simmer to reduce to thickness you want. If you like an oily style add oil at the end-not a lot, but enough to blend up. This style will need to be refrigerated so you must consider what "type" of oil you use-since it does harden when cold.
Also, if you are making a sauce, you can use some liquor, alcohol such as vodka or rum, whiskey (Jack) or other to mix to infuse.

Once you have the dried prepared grind or make into paste, you can then make that into whatever preparation you want. :-)
If you have questions, let me know. Enjoy and hope you like it.
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