"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-10-2007, 03:03 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,405
SS pans are tough even for other foods, not just omlet. However alumiun or cast iron pans are easier to work with.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 03:01 PM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
MickeyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 13
Might sound crazy, but i seaon my ss pans like i do cast iron,
rub em with veggie oil and then roast em for 30 minutes at 450

it blackens the pan just like CI
draw backs

pan must be all metal (no wood or plastic handle)

and you have to gently handwash the pan to prserve the veggie oil coating
__________________

__________________
Mickey
MickeyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 03:04 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Lady DeWinters's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Vancouver, B.C. Canada
Posts: 101
These are some very cool ideas! Thank you so much for the tips!
__________________
Food is awesome!
Asian Kitchen Recipes
Lady DeWinters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 03:45 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
Caine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: CHINATOWN
Posts: 2,314
Send a message via MSN to Caine
Turn down the heat, and use butter as your frying medium. Eggs need to be cooked in butter. They beg to be cooked in butter.
__________________
Caine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2007, 08:19 AM   #15
Head Chef
 
DramaQueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 1,347
Quote:
Originally Posted by MickeyJoe View Post
Might sound crazy, but i seaon my ss pans like i do cast iron,
rub em with veggie oil and then roast em for 30 minutes at 450

it blackens the pan just like CI
draw backs

pan must be all metal (no wood or plastic handle)

and you have to gently handwash the pan to prserve the veggie oil coating
Yep, sounds crazy all right. . Actually the reason we season Cast Iron is because it's very porous and seasoning seals the pores. Stainless steel is not porous at all so the seasoning is not necessary. I wouldn't want my ss pans to turn black because what you've done is burnt the oil into the pan. But you gotta do what you gotta do.
__________________
Visit my blogsite: Chew On This
DramaQueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2007, 09:56 AM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,922
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine View Post
Turn down the heat, and use butter as your frying medium. Eggs need to be cooked in butter. They beg to be cooked in butter.
Or bacon drippings
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2007, 10:20 AM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
MickeyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by DramaQueen View Post
Yep, sounds crazy all right. . Actually the reason we season Cast Iron is because it's very porous and seasoning seals the pores. Stainless steel is not porous at all so the seasoning is not necessary. I wouldn't want my ss pans to turn black because what you've done is burnt the oil into the pan. But you gotta do what you gotta do.
It's not crazy,

seasoning of cast iron is for several reasons, not just to "fill in the pores", corrosion resistance, flavor transfer (from previously cooked food and from the iron itself, did you ever have "steel eggs"? yuck), a light coating of baked on oil takes care of all of these problems, and yes, the pores in the CI grips the baked on oil. (Microscopically, the baked oil surface looks like an evergreen forest from the backside)

Seasoning is the wrong term for what you can do to stainless steel, but I use the term because the process if the same.

Most commercially available SS cookware has a #4 or #3 directional finish,
kinda like a brushed finish, but all the scratches go in the same direction,
this finish has the gripping properties of a pair of vise grips. Putting a nice thin coating of oil (not burned but baked on) on the pan (works for brush finish aluminum too) fills in these "scratches" and inhibits the gripping action.

True, at high temperature the oil will burn, pans treated as such are typically used for specifics. The oil in cast iron will burn too, did you ever have your dutch oven in the fire and start smelling what smells like the local greasy spoon restaurant? That's the oil rendering and burning.

I've even got some chef friends who will do a pork fat or bacon glaze on their pans, the only problem with that is, any period of inactivity could result in rancid oils on your pan, so they typically clean them at the end of the day and re season when cooking begins (one guy has his prep cooks clean and season his prized pans a couple times a week)

Anyway, if you have a pan you always use for omlets and such, you can bake a nice brown glaze onto it, and it'll be non stick.

__________________
Mickey
MickeyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2007, 10:39 AM   #18
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by MickeyJoe View Post
...Anyway, if you have a pan you always use for omlets and such, you can bake a nice brown glaze onto it, and it'll be non stick.


I sometimes get a brown glaze when I sear a piece of meat and finish it in the oven. It takes the form of light brown spots on the edges of the pan.
Is this what you are talking about?

I worked to get that stuff off and now you're telling me I should leave it on!!
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2007, 10:47 AM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I worked to get that stuff off and now you're telling me I should leave it on!!
I've always been under the impression that you want to get that off Andy. Otherwise it affects the pan as far as uniformity of heat. Is this not correct?
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2007, 10:48 AM   #20
Assistant Cook
 
MickeyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 13
Stainless Steel Pan?

Sounds like it, is it kinda slick, looks like it's wet, but dry to the touch?
Thin. smooth, no particles in it.
if so, it's what I'm talking about.

Only issue though, like i said about the bacon and pork fat
It can go rancid

If i had that occur, I would continue using the pan as is for that particular cooking session (veggies to go with the meat etc)
I love roasting a filet and then using the same pan to brown some white potatoes or saute some asparagus, they seem to just enjoy being in the meat gunk more than they like PAM or oil or such.
but then I'd clean it like you have been.

I agree with Kitchen elf too, what I'm talking about is a verythin glaze of oil.

Not the grease and gunk buildup you get from using your stovetop pan for roasting


Nothing like a nice case of the "you know what's" cause you cooked your eggs in rancid oil.
__________________

__________________
Mickey
MickeyJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.