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Old 11-20-2005, 11:51 PM   #1
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Question Yeast question

I'll be making some dinner rolls for Thanksgiving. The recipe calls for "instant yeast," but all they had at the grocery store was "rapid rise." Are they the same thing? Thanks!

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Old 11-21-2005, 12:52 AM   #2
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I've used them interchangebly at times and don't remember a difference. It will probably speed along the rising.
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Old 11-21-2005, 09:35 AM   #3
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I have never used instant yeast but if it is the type

that you mix directly in with the dry ingredients I would not do that with rapid rise yeast. Proof rapid rise yeast in liquid just like regular yeast and it should work fine.
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Old 11-21-2005, 05:48 PM   #4
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-->Bump<--

Michael in Ft Worth: Don't mean to pick on you, but I saw you online, and you appear to have good insight into matters such as these.

I am really hoping someone has a good answer to this person's question.

Thanks,
Tom
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Old 11-21-2005, 06:05 PM   #5
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After doing some more research I found this on the internet:
Here's the skinny, according to King Arthur Flour:

Q: What is the difference between instant yeast, active dry yeast, and rapid rise yeast? .
A: Active dry yeast is what most people are used to seeing in supermarkets, commonly found in strips of three packets or in jars. Because of the way it is dried, active dry yeast contains a large percentage of dead yeast cells surrounding the live yeast cells. For that reason, active dry yeast must be hydrated -- immersed in warm water -- for at least a few minutes to release the live yeast cells from the dead ones. This process, referred to as "proofing the yeast," is essential for active dry yeast

By contrast, instant yeast -- often called "instant dissolving yeast" -- is manufactured so that there are far fewer dead yeast cells. As a result, instant yeast becomes active the "instant" it contacts moisture. Rather than proofing it prior to use, simply mix instant yeast with all the other dry ingredients. Then, when liquid is added, the yeast will activate right away. Also, because there are fewer dead yeast cells in instant yeast, you need less instant yeast than active dry yeast to achieve the same effect. Some people like to proof their instant yeast anyway to assure themselves that the yeast is still fresh. Doing this causes no harm. Instant yeast and active dry yeast are created from different strains of yeast cells. Instant yeast does make the bread rise a bit faster than active dry. Instant yeast starts fast and works moderately. Active dry starts more slowly, works moderately fast, and eventually (after several hours) catches up to instant yeast. Both quit at about the same time.

Unlike both active dry yeast and instant yeast, rapid rise yeast is a whole different strain of yeast altogether. If active dry and instant yeast were marathon runners, rapid rise yeast would be a sprinter. It gives bread a speedy initial rise, but dies out quickly. Avoid rapid rise yeast when you want to develop flavor in the bread through long rising times.

But I also found this somewhere else:

Instant yeast is dried at a much lower temperature than active dry, producing more live cells and thus quicker and more vigorous action when it's added to flour and water. Instant yeast is also often referred to as: "quick yeast", "rapid rise active dry yeast", "quick rise active dry yeast", "fast-rising active dry yeast", or "fast rising yeast." It's also nearly identical (and in some cases is identical) to some brands' "bread machine yeast".

I'm just getting confused. I still can't figure out if instant and rapid rise are the same or not.
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Old 11-21-2005, 09:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corazon90
I'll be making some dinner rolls for Thanksgiving. The recipe calls for "instant yeast," but all they had at the grocery store was "rapid rise." Are they the same thing? Thanks!
Technically ... no. Will you know the difference? Probably not. If you don't proof the yeast first (put the yeast in at least half the water called for in the recipe at 110-F with a teaspoon of sugar for about 5 minutes until it starts to foam) it will take a little longer on the first rise (maybe 30 minutes). But, you should be just fine.

Don't get crazy over this.
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Old 11-21-2005, 10:27 PM   #7
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I use rapid rise, not for any particular reason other than that is all I saw at my grocery store. It works just fine.
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