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Old 03-14-2018, 05:10 PM   #1
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Baking terms and grammar

This is very confusing, and I “knead” to get it straight (pause for groan).

Dough rises. But do you rise the dough, raise the dough, prove the dough, or proof the dough? Like, if someone calls and asks you to lunch, do you tell her “Love to, but I’m rising my dough.” It sounds a bit backwoods. Or “Can’t right now, I’ve put some dough up to rise.” You put jam up to can, right? Do you put dough up to rise?

“Rise” only seems to work passively, “the dough is rising.” I don’t think you can “rise” or “raise” dough; the yeast does that. So I prefer “proof.” But is it “proof” or “prove?”

Such linguistic conundrums!

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Old 03-14-2018, 05:21 PM   #2
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Next time, just say, Im making bread.
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Old 03-14-2018, 05:33 PM   #3
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+1 Andy - yep, much less mind boggling!
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Old 03-14-2018, 05:33 PM   #4
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Like Andy said.

But, the dough proofs and it rises.
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Old 03-14-2018, 05:59 PM   #5
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Thank you medtran. It grates my nerves to hear people say "prove".

Next up on the list...

Tablespoon in a recipe is Tbsp (preferred) or T (sorta acceptable) - but it must be capitalized.

teaspoon in a recipe is tsp (preferred) or t (sorta acceptable) - but again, always lowercase.

suivant?
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Old 03-14-2018, 06:14 PM   #6
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Multi task. Put a tea towel over the bread dough while it rises and go out for lunch with your friend.
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Old 03-14-2018, 10:33 PM   #7
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Again, this is way over my head. I was never good with(?) English.
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Old 03-15-2018, 07:37 AM   #8
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This how I abbreviate:
TBSP. = Tablespoon
tsp. = teaspoon
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Old 03-15-2018, 08:24 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
...Tablespoon in a recipe is Tbsp (preferred) or T (sorta acceptable) - but it must be capitalized.

teaspoon in a recipe is tsp (preferred) or t (sorta acceptable) - but again, always lowercase.

suivant?
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
This how I abbreviate:
TBSP. = Tablespoon
tsp. = teaspoon
My standard recipe format used "T" and 't'. I was writing for me and I knew what these meant. Then SO got involved and complained so now I use 'Tb' and 'tsp'. Works for us.
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Old 03-15-2018, 09:16 AM   #10
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funny how we all use a capital T
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