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Old 02-17-2012, 06:35 PM   #11
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We have brook trout here. Have gone fishing for it. Caught a few. Very delicious.

Succotash. Lima beans and corn came from Native Americans. I wonder if that is a dish that is served elsewhere? It was one of the dishes served at the Pilgrims big dinner. I love both of those veggies, but can't eat either one. Dang it!
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Old 02-17-2012, 07:00 PM   #12
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For that matter, turkeys are native to North America. (It makes you wonder how they knew to name the country Turkey.)
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Old 02-18-2012, 02:19 AM   #13
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Chief, I take it is a fish. But what is a brookie and how did the name come about?
The species name is - the Eastern Brook Trout, or speckled trout. It is a freshwater fish that is found in streams East of the Mississippi. It ranges anywhere between 8 to 15 inches (15 inches long is huge for a brook trout). Average size is between 8 and twelve inches. Wild brook trout have an orange-pink flesh that is firm, but tender. The flavor is very similar to swordfish. I love this fish dredged in flour, and pan-fried in a couple inches of hot oil. Lightly salt when the fish is browned on both sides and removed from the pan. The fish is also used for a dish called blue trout, and is great when placed into a foil pack with sliced potatoes, onions, and carrots, with butter of course.

Many people prefer whitefish, or walleye (pickerel in Canada), or even small mouth bass and perch due to the extremely mild flavor. But me, I love brook trout. Oh, and rainbow trout, at the same size, and even brown trout taste identical to brook trout.

Brookies is short for brook trout.

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Old 02-18-2012, 02:39 AM   #14
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What about Spam? To most it is a disgusting cheap meat product and yet in Hawaii it is a delicacy.
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Old 02-18-2012, 02:49 AM   #15
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I have eaten Balut, and it was not something I would go back for. I have eaten a lot of insects, as a kid, and as an adult, and honestly, not all that bad. I have eaten horse, and honestly, it's pretty good.


As far as what we eat, that other cultures don't, I have been surprised by some of the reactions I have had from summer employees/work exchange kids. . .

The number 1 thing I was thrown off by: my Polish peeps wouldn't eat red skin new potatoes. They said that it was pig food, and what they fed farm animals. Also, they wouldn't eat a potato at all if it had skin on it.

Other than that, nothing really sticks out as a "Are you serious, you wont eat that" moment.

OH! Corn too, I have some Bolivian employees that only eat the big ole corn, corn that here, we feed to animals. Grrrrrrr, it's driving me crazy that I can't remember the name, bu tit is that really big kernel corn, and the rows are never straight. . . The maize de gringo, our nice sweet yellow corn, they refuse to eat. **EDIT** Mote( mo-tay)
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Old 02-18-2012, 02:51 AM   #16
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Quote:
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What about Spam? To most it is a disgusting cheap meat product and yet in Hawaii it is a delicacy.
In a LOT of the pacific, Spam is a staple. All throughout Indonesia, micro-nesia, it's a treat. Guam actually exceeds Hawaii in Spam consumption.
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Old 02-18-2012, 04:44 AM   #17
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The only ones I can think of are peanut butter, corn on the cob and popcorn.

I guess I need to get out more!
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:21 AM   #18
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The Iberian Peninsula Doesn´t On A Large Scale

Having lived in Madrid for quite sometime; the culinary culture has changed quite significantly due to Chef Ferrán Adriá who has endorsed uncountable imported food items. None the less, here are some that are not that popular on a large scale:

1) Raw Fish Culture - Japanese Sashimi
2) Except for Galicia, Extremadura, Catalonia ( Barcelona), Andalusia, Madrid Capital and the Canary Islands; Chili Peppers
3) Peanut Butter
4) In general, Asian Cuisines and when they do, it is in a Restaurant and they order: Rice 3 Delicious which has some peas and carrots diced tiny in it ... Spring rolls or egg rolls and the Noodles with strips of meat and shrimp. They are not too experimental. Younger generations are experimenting more and travelling more.
5) Generally, Middle Eastern Cuisines except for Hummus.
6) Corn: until very recently, this vegetable was feed for the horses and donkies ... Due to the large number of South Americans who legally reside in Spain, corn, a staple in their salads, soups, flour, desserts and dishes has become more popular.
7) Piquant spices, ginger, curry, cayenne etcetra : this is relatively not employed in most of the provinces except the ones I indicated in Number 2 ( note: there are 38 plus Melilla and Ceuta which are next to Morocco in Northern Africa, however, are Spanish territories, autonomous provinces, yet under Spanish rule ).
8) Indian cuisine: relatively untried by the masses, there are 3 excellent Indian restaurants in Madrid and alot more in Barcelona, Catalonia. The unknown of the piquant, however now younger Spaniards are experimenting more.
9) Spaniards have a very traditional home routine of stews, soups and roasts ... Now due to the 2 parent household in the work place, youngsters are watched by grandparents, if they have them --- thus, the preference is to their Traditional bean stews and soups, " the spoon tradition " is still very strong here, especially outside of the main urban cities.
10) Soy bean products: there are Vegetarian and Pescatarian people in Spain; as well as Vegans. However, the number of Vegetarians who do not eat dairy, fish and by products of an animal, are comparatively quite small in number. Spain is steeped to this day in A Pork Culture, due to the Inquisition of the 1490s - mid 1500s ... thus, Spain likes their meat, pork and beef and lamb.

Margi.
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:28 AM   #19
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Cranberries are one of the Oldest American Fruits

Cranberries were founded in Bay Colony by the 1st settlers in 1620, I believe it was.

To my knowledge; USA native foods:

1) cranberries
2) wild turkeys
3) salmon
4) lobsters ( Maine )

I am sure there are many other vegetables in the former Bay Colony ( New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island area in addition to the West --- only they were discovered later by the settlers )

M.C.
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Old 02-18-2012, 11:49 AM   #20
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What about Spam? To most it is a disgusting cheap meat product and yet in Hawaii it is a delicacy.
Adding to what Tat said, I was astonished to see huge SPAM displays in my local Korean owned supermarket. All I can guess from that is that SPAM must be very popular with Koreans.
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