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Old 04-03-2006, 09:32 PM   #1
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Labrador dogs and tumors/cysts

Just wondering if anyone here has experienced problems with their labs in terms of tumors/cysts? My lab is nearly six years old, and just recently I found a raised area around his left hind leg on top, and soon after that another noticable lump under his right arm pit. He has also had an eye tumor removed. Is this cancer, a cyst, or just fatty tissue? I know I have to take him to the vet to determine that, but just wondered if any of you had this problem with your lab?

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Old 04-03-2006, 10:22 PM   #2
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Amber I have never had a lab but I had a Red Bone Coon Hound and when he got older he got alot of cysts which is common on Red Bones they formed on his hips, neck and so on they started small then just got bigger.They were called sebaceous cysts which meant thay were fatty deposits there are a few others that are the same but only cosmetic.I did some research when I had him and found out that if a dog gets a big slow growing lump try to pick it up if its floating in the skin and you can actually get your finger under it and its not attached directly to the body its not a problem just cosmetic, if its attached to the body it could be more serious and I stress it could be.
I find it really helpful to invest in a dog veterinary book I have one called Dogs Home Veterinrary Hand Book by Delbert G. Carlson, DVM. & James M.Griffin M.D and it helps you to do a little research.If you are not happy with what your vet is telling you by all means get a second or third opinion as you would for yourself.I totally understand what a pet can mean to you I dont think of them as pets but as best friends.If you want private email me and tell me more and I will do any thing and I mean anything you need to find out more.JP
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Old 04-03-2006, 10:34 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmcgrew
Amber I have never had a lab but I had a Red Bone Coon Hound and when he got older he got alot of cysts which is common on Red Bones they formed on his hips, neck and so on they started small then just got bigger.They were called sebaceous cysts which meant thay were fatty deposits there are a few others that are the same but only cosmetic.I did some research when I had him and found out that if a dog gets a big slow growing lump try to pick it up if its floating in the skin and you can actually get your finger under it and its not attached directly to the body its not a problem just cosmetic, if its attached to the body it could be more serious and I stress it could be.
I find it really helpful to invest in a dog veterinary book I have one called Dogs Home Veterinrary Hand Book by Delbert G. Carlson, DVM. & James M.Griffin M.D and it helps you to do a little research.If you are not happy with what your vet is telling you by all means get a second or third opinion as you would for yourself.I totally understand what a pet can mean to you I dont think of them as pets but as best friends.If you want private email me and tell me more and I will do any thing and I mean anything you need to find out more.JP
Thank you! Thats very informative about the lumps floating vs, attached. I too dont think of them as pets, they are family members. Thank you so much for your help, I appreciate it. When I go to bed, and our dog is lying comfortably, I will check him out and see which type of lump he has.
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Old 04-03-2006, 10:40 PM   #4
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A lot of time they're sebacious cysts. No biggie. I've never known a lab *not* to have them.
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Old 04-04-2006, 06:42 AM   #5
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I have a Newfoundland/Lab mix and he has them too- I freaked when I found the first few, but the vet assured me they were just cysts. Funny how attached we get to our pets, huh?
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Old 04-04-2006, 08:41 AM   #6
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Amber- I have a lab and she was just recently biopsied for a mammory cyst that came back negative- she has had other fatty cysts for years now(She's 7 years old). Friends of ours who have labs for years say that they are rather "lumpy" dogs!!!The tumors/cysts are very common in the breed and usually don't cause any trouble- they should be monitiored though.I LOVE my Angel and her being lumpy doesn't out weigh the joy she brings to this family and you are so right -they are MEMBERS of the family not just some pet. Good luck with your "baby".Love and energy, Vicki
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Old 04-04-2006, 10:36 AM   #7
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PeppA and her Mom are Chihuahua people. The oldest one that we have right now has had several sebacious cysts.
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Old 04-04-2006, 03:23 PM   #8
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Thanks everyone! That eases my mind to know they could be merely sebatious cysts. I cannot afford to take him to the vet right now, so I will have to monitor his lumps. Otherwise he seems in good health.
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Old 04-08-2006, 06:17 AM   #9
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I have two geriatric Jack Russell mutts and they are so full of these cysts you describe that we've taken to calling them lumpy. The vet doesn't even bother to biopsy them, they're just sebacious (sp) -- basically lumps of fat. One is truly gross looking -- I keep waiting for it to burst and the alien to pop out. But it's normal for dogs to get more and more of them as they age. Mine are 13 and 16 years old, and every year another lump pops up. They go to the vets a few times a year (once a year for exams, a couple other times for toenail trims (we don't have a groomer near by), and she always checks over all the lumps and says they're OK.
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