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Old 12-20-2013, 07:18 AM   #101
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The one time that I hosted a dinner party with a diabetic, I made 2 desserts (not unusual for me to make more than one) One was a regular dessert and one was a bowl of very colorful in season fruit with soft, lightly sweetened whipped cream draped over it in a pretty bowl. This way there was something for the diabetic, that didn't look like a special dessert for a diabetic, it just looked pretty and tasted good. I also made sure that there was a good mix of veg at dinner that they weren't all starchy. I left it up to the person with diabetes to choose what they wanted and could have, and avoid the bread if they chose.

They didn't request any special treatment, I just wanted to give them options without making it obvious that I was catering to the diabetic in the bunch.
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Old 12-20-2013, 07:51 AM   #102
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I guess I'm part of the plain old "No thank you." group.

When I go out to eat I tend to survey the offerings and come up with my own personalized plan of attack. I really don't like to explain why I passed up the sweet potato surprise or the best ever dinner rolls and then had a nice fat piece of cheesecake. The fact is I restrict my concentrated sweets most of the time and when I go out I focus on one or two treats that catch my eye. Today it may be the cheesecake tomorrow it may be the sweet potato surprise, that's for me to decide. When I'm out I stick with dividing my plate 1/2 for low carb vegetables, 1/4 for protein and 1/4 for starches/sweets, drink plenty of water and try to go for a walk when possible. Diabetes is different for everyone and everyone needs to follow the path that's right for them not the one that was right for Uncle Joe or Cousin Betty!
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:11 AM   #103
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
GotGarlic...

are you ??? or have/do you??? any personal relationship with someone who is diabetic?

Your reply is somewhat ambivalent... and not one I completely agree with...
I used to manage the website at a medical school that has a center for diabetes education, research and patient care. For years, I edited and posted on the website information for patients written by the certified diabetes educator. Here's something similar from the Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dia...rition/DA00130

What do you find ambivalent? Do you mean ambiguous?
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:16 AM   #104
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I guess I'm part of the plain old "No thank you." group.

When I go out to eat I tend to survey the offerings and come up with my own personalized plan of attack. I really don't like to explain why I passed up the sweet potato surprise or the best ever dinner rolls and then had a nice fat piece of cheesecake. The fact is I restrict my concentrated sweets most of the time and when I go out I focus on one or two treats that catch my eye. Today it may be the cheesecake tomorrow it may be the sweet potato surprise, that's for me to decide. When I'm out I stick with dividing my plate 1/2 for low carb vegetables, 1/4 for protein and 1/4 for starches/sweets, drink plenty of water and try to go for a walk when possible. Diabetes is different for everyone and everyone needs to follow the path that's right for them not the one that was right for Uncle Joe or Cousin Betty!
And you shouldn't be expected to explain. It's as rude to make a fuss about what your guests are or are not eating as it is for the guest to do so. As a hostess I am a past-mistress of "The Look" if anyone starts on about their or anyone else's food choices. Among those who know me it works wonders. The subject is changed instantly.

Mind you, if they make a fuss about how good something is I do make allowances
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Old 12-20-2013, 08:18 AM   #105
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Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
The one time that I hosted a dinner party with a diabetic, I made 2 desserts (not unusual for me to make more than one) One was a regular dessert and one was a bowl of very colorful in season fruit with soft, lightly sweetened whipped cream draped over it in a pretty bowl. This way there was something for the diabetic, that didn't look like a special dessert for a diabetic, it just looked pretty and tasted good. I also made sure that there was a good mix of veg at dinner that they weren't all starchy. I left it up to the person with diabetes to choose what they wanted and could have, and avoid the bread if they chose.

They didn't request any special treatment, I just wanted to give them options without making it obvious that I was catering to the diabetic in the bunch.
Good move, Bakechef.
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Old 12-20-2013, 10:55 AM   #106
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Most often when a sugary product is offered to a diabetic, there is no protein readily handy to offset the sugar intake.
Just curious. How do you know it happens that way most often?
The goal is to have the proper balance over the course of a day, so a couple of cookies as an afternoon snack can be offset by having broccoli instead of rice with dinner.

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I have never said that you can never, ever have a sugary item.
And I never said you said that.

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Just think before you offer some to a known diabetic unless you also have a 'burger handy to go with it.
I trust adults to look out for their own needs and I think it would be more rude to fail to offer the same hospitality to all of my guests. I certainly don't insist if someone declines something, nor do I ask for explanations. I have my own dietary restrictions, too, so I understand.

Btw, my response was intended more to provide correct information to others reading this thread than to you, so please don't take it so personally.
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Old 12-20-2013, 11:09 AM   #107
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Diabetic! If just one more person tells me about an uncle who always eats cake, candy or whatever, and he is a diabetic, after I tell them "No thank you, I am a diabetic", may just get a taste of my fist.

So when someone tells you "I am a diabetic" don't insist that they just try a small mouthful. That is when you become an 'enabler'. It is the same as offering drugs to an addict.
Well said!

Find out what that uncle's name is. It would be interesting to keep an eye on the obituaries.
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Old 12-20-2013, 01:43 PM   #108
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My mum was diagnosed with diabetes in the mid '60s. She took her pills and weighed her food for a while. Then she learned to be able to tell what she could eat and didn't need the medication any more. One of my uncles was appalled, because he was still weighing his food. My mum ate sweets and other stuff, in moderation, when she felt that it would be okay. She had all her fingers, toes, etc. when she died over 40 years later at the age of 95. She listened to her body.
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Old 12-20-2013, 11:28 PM   #109
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To me, the long and short of the subject is TMI...Too Much Information.

No hostess or guest wants to hear why you don't want to eat something. Eat it or don't eat it, few people care to hear the "why" and your importance in food choices matters only to you.

Being a gracious guest is what's important. A simple "it looks delicious but no thank you" just shouldn't be so hard.

Making a fuss about offered food is rude, plain and simple.
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Old 12-21-2013, 04:47 AM   #110
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To me, the long and short of the subject is TMI...Too Much Information.

No hostess or guest wants to hear why you don't want to eat something. Eat it or don't eat it, few people care to hear the "why" and your importance in food choices matters only to you.

Being a gracious guest is what's important. A simple "it looks delicious but no thank you" just shouldn't be so hard.

Making a fuss about offered food is rude, plain and simple.
This reminds me of my Mother and her old friends. They used to become upset with each other when they got together and the subject turned to aches, pains, medical conditions, etc...

They finally took a page from the military and adopted or perhaps adapted the DADT policy.

Don't ask, don't tell!
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