"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-24-2013, 05:41 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 347
Boiling potatoes...and other foods?

potatoes and cold water bring to a boil,for mash pot. when i was doing this i rem. some where read or heard you bring the water and potatoes up to boil gradually. I usually get water to a boil on high then back it down. Is there some kind of rule on what foods you wouldnt go to high to get it to a boil,but bring to a boil gradually? I am thinking only ones with maybe a sugar base,or
is there more. Thanks . I guess what i am asking is there only certain times you can only do boil on high and back it down....when it says bring to a boil.

__________________

__________________
mumu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2013, 05:54 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,349
For water-based liquids (not melted sugar), get the pot to boiling on high. You usually do this then reduce to a simmer. It's just a matter of time. You want to get the pot boiling quickly so you can adjust to simmer and go about your business. I can not think of a reason to do so more slowly when the goal is to reduce to a simmer or continue boiling.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2013, 05:55 PM   #3
Executive Chef
 
Whiskadoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Twin Cities Mn
Posts: 2,953
I think I do what you do. Peel potatoes, or not. Put them in a pot and fill with water one inch or so above the potatoes. Turn the fire on, usually pretty high. When they come to a boil, Put the cover on and lower temp to just above simmer and cook 20 minutes or so until they test done with a fork.

I don't know about sugars or starches or if this is a good or preferred way to cook 'em. I am impatient so want them to heat up fastest as possible.

If mashing, I drain them, return the potatoes to the pot and shake them over the Again raised temp on the burner to encourage some of the steam to escape. If making potatoes for like potato salad, I usually cook them in their jackets, allow the potato to cool til can handle easily, then peel. The skiins should easily slip off.
__________________
Whiskadoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2013, 07:58 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
Mashed potatoes can be a little more complicated. If you have the problem of mashed potatoes coming out rather gluey, not soft and fluffy, consider these things.

Potato starch is stored in rather large packets prone to damage. You would like to keep those intact, since breaking them releases the starch and can lead to the undesirable texture. The key is managing temperature in two steps.

The first step stabilizes the starch granules. Cook potato slices in 150F water for 30 minutes. Then, cool them rapidly in ice water. The starch in the packets are now gelled and stable. The technical term is starch retrograde. This is permanent, so it can be done ahead.

You can now used high heat to finish cooking them, and you can mash them without so much fear of spoiling the texture. A ricer, chinois, or similar tool is better than a potato masher, and hand beaters/mixers should never be used.

The other issue is choice of potato variety. Yukon Gold types have less starch and so boil well, but they must be carefully handled as above if you're going to get them smooth enough with going gluey. Russet types will be mealier and will have more starch and will handle well for mashed.
__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2013, 12:14 PM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 347
thanks..... i have seen rec. where they say simmer,but never mention to bring to a boil first. One is a sloppy joe rec. it says brown meat and than simmer for xxx amt. of time.so one cant assume when see simmer in rec. you turn to high to boil than down to simmer?
__________________
mumu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2013, 12:54 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 347
little confused here. First of all i know what a simmer is . But when a rec. says bring to a simmer and simmer for x amt . of time,am i correct to either bring to a boil first then down to simmer or gradually bring up to simmer.One saves time doing boil first,right? Basically the rec. doesnt have to say boil first .
__________________
mumu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2013, 01:31 PM   #7
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,349
Use your highest heat to get the pot boiling then reduce the heat to make the pot simmer.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2013, 01:39 PM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 347
would u do the same for rec. that says bring to a simmer?
__________________
mumu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2013, 01:52 PM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 347
i just read for milk or cream based u dont do a boil first. can scorch
__________________
mumu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2013, 02:51 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by mumu View Post
thanks..... i have seen rec. where they say simmer,but never mention to bring to a boil first. One is a sloppy joe rec. it says brown meat and than simmer for xxx amt. of time.so one cant assume when see simmer in rec. you turn to high to boil than down to simmer?
When you brown beef, it's already pretty hot, probably boiling, so you can lower it to a simmer and continue with the recipe. With dairy products, yes, boiling them will cause them to scorch. So you bring them to a simmer at a lower temperature and watch them so they don't boil.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
potatoes, other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.