"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-28-2010, 05:22 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Calling all tech wizards! Setting up a sort routine to put the above, and any future posts on this thread in alphabetical order is a great idea. Can it be done? 2nd question; with all of the alphabetized info already available on the WWW for those who are willing to search, is it worth the effort?

My basic cooking tip for today: When making quickbreads, that is, any batter based bread or cake that uses baking powder, or baking soda and an acid to leaven the product, greater loft, or a lighter product can be obtained by seperating the egg used in the recipe, and beating the egg white into a marangue, then folding the marangue into the batter. Also, 3 tbs. of cooking fat, be it butter, oil, or whatever, will give a more moist end product than will lesser amounts of fat. When using all-purpose flour in quickbreads, beat only until the ingredients are combined as overmixing will develop the gluten in the flour, resulting in a tougher end product.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2010, 08:47 PM   #12
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,346
I just started reading this thread and see there is a lot of good information here. Thanks to all who have taken the time to create and post these great explanations.

I do feel we have an obligation to ensure the information we provide here is as accurate as we can make it. We should not be publishing erroneous information under the guise of fact.

Also, we should all use SPELL CHECKER.

In reading over the definitions posted to date, I have encountered a few I don’t feel are completely accurate. Here they are with my version following:


Kabob - a method of grilling where the food is cut into bite-sized chunks and skewered, seasoned, and cooked over open flame.

A kabob or kebab (there are a number of spelling variations) is not a method of grilling but a piece of food that is cooked, usually on a skewer.


Grilling: …Also flavors imparted from the cooking process, such as charcoal or smoked woods go into the meat.

Smoked woods or charcoal are not a necessary part of grilling. Perhaps desirable to some, but not a requirement of the definition.

Broiling: …You'll get all the benefits of the Maillard reaction, but the taste won't reflect that of grilling...meaning no good smokey eats from charcoal and wood additives. Although if you grill with propane, you're essentially broiling already, but with a bottom heat source. :P

…and if you broil with natural gas or electric heating elements, you are already grilling but with a top heat source. :P

Definitions should not include opinion, even tongue in cheek.

Scientific evidence shows that the grilled flavor of meats is the result of meat juices vaporizing on the hot surfaces of the coals or lava rocks in the grill rather than from the charcoal or wood coals used as the heat source. Also refer to Goodweed’s definition of GRILLED FLAVOR.

Slowly cooking foods in a smoker where smoking wood products provide significant flavor are in a different category.


Sweating: Cooking aromatics in oil at a high temperature, to release flavor and prepare aromatic veggies for incorporation into the rest of the dish. This is found primarily with onions and garlic. You always start by putting your oil in the pan, then cook your onions/garlic for a short time to tender them and get all those great flavors flowing.

The primary difference in sweating aromatics as opposed to sautéing aromatics is that sweating should be done over lower heat so no color is imparted to the aromatics. Successfully sweated aromatics should not be browned. Sautéed aromatics should have some browning.

The fat used does not have to be oil.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2010, 05:36 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Andy; you are indispensible around here. Do you know that?

However, that being said, I'm not sure that we aren't both a bit correct with Kabob, or Kebob. From Miriam-Webster Dictionary, I found the following, and I quote: "
Main Entry: ke·bab
Variant(s): or ke·bob also ka·bob \kə-ˈbäb also ˈkā-ˌ\
Function: noun
Etymology: ultimately from Arabic or Persian kabāb, from Turkish kebap
Date: 1673
: cubes of meat (as lamb or beef) marinated and cooked with vegetables usually on a skewer


A kabob or kebab (there are a number of spelling variations) is not a method of grilling but a piece of food that is cooked, usually on a skewer.

I was going to try to argue the point. However, after comparing my original definition, and your explanation to Webster's, I believe you are the more correct, as Kebob is a noun rather than a verb. And so, again my freind, I bow my hat to you.

Thanks for the corrections.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2010, 10:02 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
spork's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Landlocked in Southwest U.S.
Posts: 1,123
clearly, this project is a wiki app
which i think is open source

a DC wiki on basic cooking terms, open to edit by members, is a great idea!
__________________
spork is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2010, 03:21 AM   #15
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: japan
Posts: 462
wiki app? open source?

ok. i've looked things up on wiki, but never added anything.

so, i thinking i'd look up how to do it, i googled "culinary terminology". it turns out that there are tons of cooking dictionaries out there already. here are a few:

Cooking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Category:Cooking techniques - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Linda's Culinary Dictionary Index, Food Dictionary, Food Glossary, Culinary Glossary, A Dictionary and History of Cooking, Food, and Beverage Terms

abalone Definition in the Food Dictionary at Epicurious.com

Culinary Dictionaries and Glossaries

Home Cooking Glossary of Cooking and Food Recipes from A to Z

Food Lorists: Culinary Terminology

Cooks Recipes | Cooking Dictionary: Culinary Terms From A to Z


well, you get the picture. i'm willing to help some, but i think we'll need to think of how to make a better, easier-to-use product.

1 thing i noticed with most sites is that they are laden with ads which take a long time to load and then you have to go to the letter of the alphabet, that has to load, etc., etc.

i like the layout of the wiki where all the terms are laid out for you to see at a glance. maybe we could attempt something like that!?
__________________
let me make sure that wine's ok before i use it.
philso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2010, 12:10 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
All Wikki aside, back to the business of giving information;

Cure - alters the texture and flavor of raw meat through the addition of salt, herbs and spices, sugar, water, and sometimes living microbial cultures.

There are two curing techniques of which I'm aware - wet cure and dry cure.

Wet curing is done with bacon, ham and similar products. The raw meat is injected or soaked in a flavored solution that infuses salt, sugar, and smoke flavoring into the meat. The meat is then stored under temperature and moisture controlled conditions for a specified period of time before it is either sold to be cooked, or further processed by the maker. American bacon is cured and sold uncooked. Ham is wet cured, then cooked or smoked before selling to the public.


Dry Cure is a method where the meat is ground, and mixed with a bacterial culture, sugar, salt, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, and various hebs and spices, then usually filled into a casing, and allowed to ferment, or cure in a temperature and humidity controlled environment. Hard salami, pepperoni, and soprasetta are three examples of dry cured sausages. The bacterial cultures consume the sugars in the sausage and give off acids that chemically "cook" the meat and fats. The acid also becomes strong enough to inhibit the growth of harmful orgnizms in the meat. The sodium nitrates and nitrites are used to prevent the growth of the bacterial agent that produces botulism. Herbs and spices are used for flavoring. Hard salamis have a mold culture applied to the casing to prprotect the sausage from other oranizms that might be harmful. It is harmless and is washed away before the salami is sold.

Both of these techniques should be left to the experts as when done improperly, can be very dangerous. Feel free owever to use the wet cure technique to make your own bacon, or hams, as these meats are cooked to destroy nasty critters. Also, if the term - cotto - is in the sausage name, it is a cooked sausage, i.e. cotto salami.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.