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Old 08-05-2014, 02:10 PM   #31
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I like the idea of the cheese dish - however, it strikes me that it would require quite a slab to place there else it might dry out a much smaller piece.

So, I am now discarding my usual method of cheese storage (wrapping tightly in greaseproof and then in foil) and have wrapped it loosely in greaseproof and placed this in a plastic bag in fridge. Think it will work!
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Old 08-05-2014, 02:26 PM   #32
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Hi Got Garlic,
That was me . I usually take off most of the green myself but leave a couple of inches of stem intact. I have always found it works for me but I see that I hadn't made my method clear. Apologies
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Old 08-05-2014, 02:36 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I'm pretty sure you are right. The word "leaves" was used.
The only time I store carrots is in the winter. They go in a bucket with sawdust (stored vertically like they come out of the ground). The tops are left on (they die back), but in the spring, they will sprout new tops. Otherwise, I only pick carrots on an as-needed basis.
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Old 08-05-2014, 05:14 PM   #34
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I like the idea of the cheese dish - however, it strikes me that it would require quite a slab to place there else it might dry out a much smaller piece.
Don't give up on the idea of a cheese dish. I have one of these small, 4 1/2"X6", Sandland Ware cheese dishes from the 1950's. It is just right for keeping a quarter pound of cheddar on the kitchen table at room temperature for a few days. A glass or ceramic butter dish would also be a good choice for a small household.


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Old 08-05-2014, 07:02 PM   #35
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Don't give up on the idea of a cheese dish. I have one of these small, 4 1/2"X6", Sandland Ware cheese dishes from the 1950's. It is just right for keeping a quarter pound of cheddar on the kitchen table at room temperature for a few days. A glass or ceramic butter dish would also be a good choice for a small household.


What an interesting looking cheese dish. I'm not about to start putting cheddar in one. It would get eaten far too fast.

I have a cheese bell something like this, but with a marble base. We use it for Brie and Camembert:

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Old 08-05-2014, 07:10 PM   #36
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What an interesting looking cheese dish. I'm not about to start putting cheddar in one. It would get eaten far too fast.

I have a cheese bell something like this, but with a marble base. We use it for Brie and Camembert:

I have a small glass bell similar to that one also, I just set it on a pretty salad plate and use it for butter or cheese.

I only keep cheese out at room temperature once in a while these days.

When I was growing up my Mother always had a pound out on the table, times change.
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Old 08-05-2014, 09:24 PM   #37
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I leave the wrapper on, too, but I put the whole thing in another plastic bag, unsealed, because DH usually rips open the wrapper Wiping the wrapper with vinegar is a great tip
I put it in another bag, too! That just didn't make my post somehow. I have menopause brain...
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Old 02-09-2015, 05:27 PM   #38
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Yes great! Thanks for contributing.

If someone has a successful way of storing cheese, i.e. without it going sweaty or mouldy, I would like to know. I have tried wrapping it in greaseproof paper and then in foil but it is not very effective. I read today that it needs some air (to not go mouldy) and that storing it in a loose plastic bag that has some kitchen paper towel in it, crumpled is good. Anyone tried this or have another method?
The 'fridge isn't really the ideal place to store cheese. I have an antique cheese preserver made of stoneware by the Langley pottery (IIRC or it could be the Moira Pottery). It looks like a stoneware casserole dish but the base inside, has raised fins. Like this one

Rare Vintage Moira Stoneware Cheese Preserver w/ Lid (08/12/2008)

You put vinegar in the bottom and the cheese on top of the fins clear of the vinegar, put the lid on the container and put it in a cool place out of the sun and Bob's your uncle and Charlie's your aunt. We used to use it at the caravan in the days before caravans had 'fridges (Yes, I AM that old!) and it worked very well. I inherited it and it still works. I don't put it in the 'fridge so the cheese is always at the right temperature for eating and never goes clammy or mouldy. I think the fumes of the vinegar (I use malt vinegar) must deter the mould spores.


This is similar but, obviously, not stoneware
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Old 02-09-2015, 05:51 PM   #39
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IN the store, the carrots I buy look like they were just pulled out of the ground complete with stems and leaves. This tells me they haven't been in the store very long. I'm convinced they have more flavor. I have the bag person twist off the tops for me and I use them within a couple days. I can see how fresh they are for sure. Who knows about those big flavorless carrots in the bin.
I buy what are called "horse carrots" for the Wonder Horse and he very kindly lets me have some for home. The only reason they are "horse" carrots is because they are mis-shapen in some way so won't meet the supermarkets' demand for perfectly formed, even-sized and otherwise matching carrots. I buy them at the greengrocer who gets them direct from the grower so they are fresh and delicious. They cost £2.50 for a 12 kilogram netting bag as opposed to £1 for a 500 gram plastic bag and the empty netting bag is useful for scrubbing the WH's water trough and feed buckets. Happy horse and happy cook!
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Old 02-09-2015, 06:04 PM   #40
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It's fine to wash mushrooms with water. In fact, for some kinds of mushrooms it's a huge mistake not to.

Here's Harold McGee on the topic:

"I was skeptical about the mushrooms-absorb-water idea and so did the soaking experiments with standard white mushrooms for ďThe Curious CookĒ back in 1990. Iíve since tried a number of others, and if you make sure to shake the water out of the nooks, fresh mushrooms absorb little if any water. Iíd also say that since theyíre already around 90% water, a little more or less isnít going to make much of a practical difference in the subsequent cooking....

So I wash my mushrooms with a clear conscience.

Harold"
My grandmother (the one who was a great cake maker but a bad cook with anything else, used to soak mushrooms in salt water for a minimum of half an hour "to make sure they weren't poisonous" (don't ask!). By the time they came out of the water they were soggy and waterlogged and they stewed rather than fried so you never got a lovely fried mushroom with a firm texture and nice browned edges.
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