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Old 10-03-2006, 01:08 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
And make sure you let it rest for at least 30 minutes before cutting and serving.
OK, I don't have the patience it takes for that. I admire those of you who do! Just another vote for covering your lasagna for part of the time and uncovered the rest. Ditto the heavy pan. Makes a WORLD of difference.
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Old 10-03-2006, 01:14 PM   #12
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the rested lasagna cuts evenly without oozing all over the place. guests don't have third degree burns on their toungues or roofs of their mouths, etc. and the rest period is another reason I like an enameled cast iron lasagna pan ... hold the heat.
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Old 10-03-2006, 01:22 PM   #13
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I know all about that stuff Robo...I am just too much of a lasagna addict to wait that long. Oozing cheese...mmmmmmmmmmmm! Just call me Garfield.
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Old 10-03-2006, 04:18 PM   #14
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Getting your Lasagne warm in the middle shouldn't be a problem. I usually use a glass pyrex dish and cover it with foil for about 50 minutes and then uncover it for the remaining 10 minutes.

I usually grease the pan a lot so it is earier to clean. Reynolds makes a non stick foil called "Release" and the cheese doesn't stick.
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Old 10-03-2006, 04:34 PM   #15
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Depending on the size of your pan, an hour may not be enough, especially since your cheese is cold (or should be).

Cover the lasagna for the first hour. Marinara is acidic and will eat through your foil, leaving unsightly liquid foil on your lasagna. Leave the cheese off till you uncover.

After you make the last layer and spread the marinara on top, put either a piece of waxed paper, parchment paper, or plastic wrap (it will not melt, I promise!) on the top of the pasta/sauce. Don't let the edges hang over, just tuck them into the corners. Then cover with foil and bake in a preheated (this is important) oven for an hour. Uncover, and sprinkle with cheese, and then bake another 20 minutes or till the cheese is melted and golden.

For ten bucks you can invest in an instant read thermometer....you lasagna should be 145. Temp in the middle. Then, let it rest on the counter for 20 minutes- 30 minutes before cutting.

When you wrap any leftovers, let it cool completely before covering it. (that doesn't mean leave it on the counter till it cools, please refrigerate) Then, recover the same way you baked, to keep it moist but foil free.
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Old 10-03-2006, 05:42 PM   #16
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VB, you should only have a problem with the sauce eating holes in the aluminum foil if you are using a metal pan other than aluminum. In the presence of an acidic environment, the contact of the two different metals in the presence of an acid generates a mild electric current that eats the foil. If you are using a non-metallic pan, foil on the lasagna won't be a problem.

In a restaurant envoironment, where most of the baking pans are stainless, you are correct to recommend an insulating layer between the foil and the food.
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Old 10-03-2006, 06:12 PM   #17
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"Cover the lasagna for the first hour. Marinara is acidic and will eat through your foil, leaving unsightly liquid foil on your lasagna."

No offense VeraBlue, but what are you cooking your lasagna with - Plutonium?

In the 30+ years I've been making lasagna & other baked pasta dishes using both homemade & commercial jarred marinara sauce, I have never EVER ended up with "liquid" aluminum foil. In fact, even using a metal pan I've never had aluminum foil melt. Your experience is definitely a first, & I doubt commonplace.

Now as far as your advice to bake lasagna covered with plastic wrap - that I've definitely had melt at outrageously low temps & will NEVER use it in an oven - microwave or regular anymore.
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Old 10-03-2006, 08:24 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
VB, you should only have a problem with the sauce eating holes in the aluminum foil if you are using a metal pan other than aluminum. In the presence of an acidic environment, the contact of the two different metals in the presence of an acid generates a mild electric current that eats the foil. If you are using a non-metallic pan, foil on the lasagna won't be a problem.

In a restaurant envoironment, where most of the baking pans are stainless, you are correct to recommend an insulating layer between the foil and the food.
Andy, that happens at home too...with a ceramic lasagna pan. Maybe I've just got just the touch to make radioactive marinara? Your statement is so interesting, though. Where do you come by that information? Since I've seen it happen so often, with so many types of pans, I always assumed it was the tomatoes...
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Old 10-03-2006, 08:28 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
"Cover the lasagna for the first hour. Marinara is acidic and will eat through your foil, leaving unsightly liquid foil on your lasagna."

No offense VeraBlue, but what are you cooking your lasagna with - Plutonium?

In the 30+ years I've been making lasagna & other baked pasta dishes using both homemade & commercial jarred marinara sauce, I have never EVER ended up with "liquid" aluminum foil. In fact, even using a metal pan I've never had aluminum foil melt. Your experience is definitely a first, & I doubt commonplace.

Now as far as your advice to bake lasagna covered with plastic wrap - that I've definitely had melt at outrageously low temps & will NEVER use it in an oven - microwave or regular anymore.
As I said, don't let it hang over and make sure it's all covered with the foil. It never melts, at temps of upwards of 450. It's all in the way things are handled, breezy.

As for foil melting onto marinara, sure, it's commonplace, especially when people cook professionally. We see it all the time. Maybe Andy has something with his metal on metal statement.

As far as cooking with plutonium...well, breezy, I could give you my recipes, but I don't really think you're all that interested in having that conversation. This just seemed like another opportunity for you to take a swipe at me. Still don't know why...never really did anything to you that I'm aware of. Maybe you just don't like me.
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Old 10-03-2006, 08:42 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clairebear
Hi, 1st post woo-hoo!

I love making Lasagne and the recipe I use is delicious but it never seems piping hot in the middle. Normal I cook it uncovered for about 1hr by which time the top is brown but in the middle it's only just hot. I like it piping hot!

Should I be covering it with tin foil and only taking it off for the last few minutes?
Thanks for all your help!
Hi and welcome Clairebear. I cook it with foil for approx. 30 minutes and then remove the foil to brown slightly, that should get the inside hot for you.
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