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Old 01-08-2012, 05:33 PM   #1
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London Broil, how to?

I bought two of these huge steaks..

I think they are very large, thick Sirloins, not Flank..

tonight, I'm cutting one into strips for Stroganoff..

but from reading, it looks like a nice method is to Marinate, then Broil or grill and serve quite rare?

Bucky had a nice sounding Dipping Sauce also of fish sauce /Asian flavors that sounds good..

Thanks, Eric, Austin Tx.

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Old 01-08-2012, 06:18 PM   #2
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I like to marinate (since it is quite thick, over night) in my favorite soy-sauce based marinade, then put over charcoal and grill to very rare. Then for the first meal (there are only two of us) we eat it as is, the rest I slice and freeze or refrigerate. The leftovers (for us, most of the meat) are excellent in Thai/Vietnamese salads, chop chae, but also sandwiches or beef stew.

With this, the carving is of primo importance. Slice very thin, on an angle. If you're making it for a group, I'd do it to rare, as above, then cut in half and put one half back over the coals to medium. Your outside slices will be well done, inside medium, and the first half will have the rare. Used to do it often when I lived near my family. I think my sister's father-in-law would have a cow when he saw the rare, until I reassured him that half (it was a very big one) was going back on the grill.
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:23 PM   #3
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Oh, I really don't know what the cut is really called, because flank can be "London Broil" as well, the one I'm talking about was marketed at such and was a very thick, large piece that was the size of a huge chuck, but not chuck, much more lean and solid.
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Old 01-08-2012, 08:28 PM   #4
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London Broil is not a cut of meat, but a method of cooking.
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Old 01-08-2012, 09:02 PM   #5
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Most "London Broil" is probably top round , not flank (90 percent is not flank ) Cook it rare and slice it thin under high heat, over the grill or broiler. Garlic bread and beef gravy on a hard roll is just a good way to fall in love with it! Don't over cook and let it rest for up to a half hour, covered. Thin slicing is the key. Resting is the flavor and tenderness. After its cooked , rested, and sliced it may be put back on the heat to cook longer if it's prefered to cook med or well. Flank steak , I have not seen 3 inches thick , (the cow would have to be 3,000 lbs ), not too tender!! I don't know why , but flank steak is also very expensive , the price will tell the truth!
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Old 01-09-2012, 12:52 AM   #6
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Flank is one of those cuts that were very cheap when I was young (I'm 56). Then it became the rage, and now it is expensive. Roll eyes.
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Old 01-09-2012, 01:04 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salt and pepper View Post
Most "London Broil" is probably top round , not flank (90 percent is not flank ) Cook it rare and slice it thin under high heat, over the grill or broiler. Garlic bread and beef gravy on a hard roll is just a good way to fall in love with it! Don't over cook and let it rest for up to a half hour, covered. Thin slicing is the key. Resting is the flavor and tenderness. After its cooked , rested, and sliced it may be put back on the heat to cook longer if it's prefered to cook med or well. Flank steak , I have not seen 3 inches thick , (the cow would have to be 3,000 lbs ), not too tender!! I don't know why , but flank steak is also very expensive , the price will tell the truth!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
Flank is one of those cuts that were very cheap when I was young (I'm 56). Then it became the rage, and now it is expensive. Roll eyes.
Beef Fajitas happened.
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Old 01-09-2012, 04:32 AM   #8
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i second what salt and pepper said. london broil is usually cut from top round, and it's very lean. flank is thinner and much fattier, therefore the cooking methods would most likely be different. also, i've found flank takes better to marinades than does london broil. i love flank marinated in teryaki as the fat really picks it up.

but if you're going to make the bok choy sauce for top round london broil, i usually like to cook it very plainly. no need to gild refined gold or paint the lily as the expression goes.

i generously s&p the hunk o' cow, then put it under the broiler or on the grill for 8 to 10 minutes per side, a little longer if it really is 3 inches thick. don't go crazy turning it over and over and end up overcooking it. medium rare is best.

and as salt and pepper said, tent and rest it while you make the ginger, garlic, soy, fish sauce and bok choy. put the bok choy around the plate, slice the steak and put it in the middle, then pour the remaining sauce over the meat.

hth.
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:46 AM   #9
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Just make sure you cut it thinly and AGAINST the grain or it will be extraordinarily tough.
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Old 01-10-2012, 08:39 PM   #10
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My FIL made the best London Broil I have ever had. Too bad he passed away 20 years ago. He grilled it on his gas grill and served it sliced thinly, dipped in melted butter on sliced bread. Yum yum!
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