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Old 02-08-2012, 11:47 PM   #11
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No. I didn't use a brick.
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Old 02-09-2012, 12:21 AM   #12
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I don't like a brick, either. To me, it's like pressing down on a hamburger. I want the juices to stay inside the bird.
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Old 02-09-2012, 12:30 AM   #13
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I'm with both of you about the brick. Besides, there's no way mine would brown so beautifully under a brick.
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Old 02-09-2012, 06:59 AM   #14
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butterflied (I like that word better)

You may not know it, Kayelle, but you've just touched one of the raging controversies in the culinary world. To wit: Just what is spatchcocking.

Most Americans, if they even know the word spatchcock, use it inter-changeably with butterfly. In general, however, we say butterfly and the Brits say spatchcock.

However, there is also a technical difference between them. If you merely cut away the backbone and open the bird like a book, you have butterflied it. To spatchcock you have to go further, and remove all the rib bones as well; a step most of us do not take.

All that aside, I'm with you on this: higher heat and faster cooking. Most often, in fact, I do a bird like that on the grill, after first rubbing it with a compound butter under the skin.
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Old 02-09-2012, 07:40 AM   #15
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In my experience, using the brick(s) seems to make the skin have more contact with the pan with better crisping results.
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Old 02-09-2012, 07:59 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
In my experience, using the brick(s) seems to make the skin have more contact with the pan with better crisping results.
So are you cooking it skin side down?
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Old 02-09-2012, 08:06 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silversage View Post
So are you cooking it skin side down?

You would if you used a brick.
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Old 02-09-2012, 08:22 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
You may not know it, Kayelle, but you've just touched one of the raging controversies in the culinary world. To wit: Just what is spatchcocking.

Most Americans, if they even know the word spatchcock, use it inter-changeably with butterfly. In general, however, we say butterfly and the Brits say spatchcock.

However, there is also a technical difference between them. If you merely cut away the backbone and open the bird like a book, you have butterflied it. To spatchcock you have to go further, and remove all the rib bones as well; a step most of us do not take.
A raging controversy?

Language evolves. New words and new meanings are added to the dictionary every year. Perhaps in the 18th century the term spatchcock was confined to Britain and necessitated removing the rib cage. In large part thanks to the interwebs, people on different parts of the globe have traded not only recipes, but language. North Americans, Europeans, even Australians (gasp!) have adopted each others' terms. Even your name, Foodie, wasn't in our lexicon 30 years ago.

I'm not qualified to speak for "most Americans", but the ones that I meet on the internet understand and use the term spatchcock precisely as the original poster did. If you 'Google" the word (Google is definitely one of those new words), you find that most sites describe it as removing the backbone or splitting it open at the back. Only one includes removing the sternum. And none mention the ribs.

We no longer speak the same language as Charles Dickens.
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:13 AM   #19
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Yea, and besides all that, butterflied is easier to spell and is also a more descriptive word.
Spatchcock sounds like Sasquatch chicken.
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Old 02-09-2012, 11:19 AM   #20
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...sounds like Sasquatch chicken.

I had that once. It's not bad if you can deal with the hairs.
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