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Old 02-18-2012, 05:27 PM   #11
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First, you find some aged USDA prime, bone-in ribeye, and select the two best steaks. Then you hop a flight and come to my home town, then to my house. I've got the cast iron pan that's just right for the job. We'll season with salt and pepper only. I'll cook the first steak to perfection, with some sauteed portabella caps on the side, and invite you to cook the 2nd one, using the same technique I used. Then we break out the A1 Sauce, the Lee & Perrin's Worcestershire sauce, some good, home made salsa, and sever it up with steamed asparagus on the side. I'll eat my steak, and you eat yours.

Easy, right?

Seriously, it depends on the thickness of the steak, and what cut you are using. Remember, the goal is to get the meat hot enough to fulfill your particular taste. Searing does not seal in the juices. Try it. you will see juices pool on top of the steak while the other side is forming that wonderfully flavored browned crust. Flip it over after three minutes and let it sit for another three minutes. Again, you will see juices oozing out the top.

What searing does, is to make that wonderfully browned, and flavorful crust. What makes it juicy and tender is cooking it to the proper temperature, and choosing a good cut of meat.

The above directions were for a rare, bone-in steak, chuck, rib-eye, 7 bone, etc. If I were cooking top round, I would pound it to help tenderized the meat. In fact, I have a spring-loaded chopper with three blades that I use to work seasoned flour into the meat for chicken fried steak. Cook that steak in a little oil for about ten minutes per side, over low heat. cook until the coating is well browned.

For sirloin, brisket, flat-iron, petite, flank, and hangar steak, I cook for about 3 minutes per side, or until the meat juices begin to appear on top. I remove the meat to a platter and let rest for about seven minutes. Then I slice it on the bias, against the grain, to form thin slices of medium rare meat.

Porterhouse, T-bone, New york Strip, Ribeye (also called club steak) are all cooked the same way.

A classic technique for Beef Tenderloin; cut into 1 inch thick medallions, seasoned with salt an pepper, wrapped with bacon that is secured to the sides with toothppicks, and fried in butter for 4 minutes per side. Top with a steamed artichoke heart, with mushrooms on the side. Place compound butter on top, before placing the artichoke heart on top.

Now if you're going outside, just make a camp fire and skewer that steak on a stick. Roast over the hot coals and then eat it like you were a carnivorous animal. Or, gill it over hot charcoal.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:29 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Searing doesn't seal in juices, though. That's a "kitchen myth"

But you need to start with a dry, preferably room temp piece of meat.
Nevertheless I don't feel that my pan fried steak was steamed. I think that conduction is the main heating mechanism by far.

Try this:

1. steam a steak

2. pan fry a steak

Compare the two.
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:00 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Nevertheless I don't feel that my pan fried steak was steamed. I think that conduction is the main heating mechanism by far.

Try this:

1. steam a steak

2. pan fry a steak

Compare the two.
In my dishwasher ? Like salmon?

Unless your steak was wet when it hit the pan I'm sure you didn't steam it.
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:08 PM   #14
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In my dishwasher ? Like salmon?
At first you almost had me suckered, until I recalled the oddball stunts where people did cook stuff in dishwashers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Unless your steak was wet when it hit the pan I'm sure you didn't steam it.
The sub-discussion started with a comment regarding steaming as an appreciable effect in pan frying steaks. I doubted that, and still doubt it, but evidently not for the correct reasons. And no, I don't wash my steaks. Unless of course I'm cooking them in my dish washer.
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:09 PM   #15
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Has anyone had any luck with bacon wrapped around a filet mignon? I always pull it off and throw it away. It's never cooked enough for my taste. I detest limp bacon.
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:11 PM   #16
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TL I bought some bacon wrapped FMs at the market and tried them, with the same result, limp bacon, maybe not even fully cooked. Maybe it's only for people who like very well done steaks.
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:11 PM   #17
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Has anyone had any luck with bacon wrapped around a filet mignon? I always pull it off and throw it away. It's never cooked enough for my taste. I detest limp bacon.
I think the bacon is there to help keep the steak moist. Eating it is optional. This has been around for decades when most steak was quite a bit fattier than they are today, so by those standards filet must have seemed quite dry....
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:39 PM   #18
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I love the bacon wrapped around a Filet Mignon. Yes, it is limp, but sooo good!
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:56 PM   #19
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I just can't waste bacon. I eat it too!
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Old 02-18-2012, 06:59 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I just can't waste bacon. I eat it too!
I did for a long time, 'cause well BACON! But, I realized that it was just too nasty for me, even if it was BACON!
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