"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > BBQ & Smokin' Meats
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-09-2006, 11:07 PM   #31
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
I like my method though.

To me, that seems to be the better way to go. BBQ restaurants do it this way as well. They slow-cook their ribs for about 7 hours in big giant smokers.

This process helps to lock in the natrural flavor of the meat, and lets the dry rub work its magic for the best tasty ribs you ever want to try!!


~Corey123.
__________________

__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2006, 08:31 AM   #32
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
It is interesting to see the length of time most of you cook the ribs. Hmmmm. I wonder if our Kiwi swine are naturally more tender ( insert tongue in cheek smiley here) because mine need no longer than 40 minutes after the simmer! Im saving heaps on gas/power then.

It isn't really a question of 'tender" in the US. It is called "falling off the bone meltingly good meat" which is the way we refer to our ribs and pulled pork. The low and slow method of cooking pork is "just the way it is done" for good BBQ pork. And if you simmer, you are just removing wonderful meat juices, in my opinion. And let me say I have tried it--I used to do that but learned a much better way.
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2006, 08:56 AM   #33
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
Yes, simmering or parboiling, as it is called, tends to lose some of the natural meat juices and flavor of the ribs or fresh shoulder in the water that it is parboiled in.

And then, what do you do with the water, throw it away?

My method, the ribs or shoulder get steamed and baked because you put a little bit of water on the bottom of the pan(s) with the meat on the racks, so there is a much less chance of the meat swimming in the water.

The small amount of water also keeps any fat that may drip from the meat that collects at the bottom of the pan from smoking and burning. And the meat is not sitting directly in that fat! During the last half hour or so, remove the foil or cover from the pan or roaster to let the outside of the meat dry or crisp up.

And you'll have perfectly browned smoky-tasting ribs!!


~Corey123.
__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2006, 05:11 AM   #34
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I actually like beef ribs marinaded in a kal-bi sauce, then cooked over charcoal. As usual, I don't have a recipe per se -- soy sauce, vinegar or wine. a tablespoon or so of sugar -- however, honey, syrup or jam will do (one year I dispatched an entire batch of my sister's failed orange marmalade this way). Drop of sesame oil or a spoon full of sesame seed. Then hot sauce or dried chili flakes or a fresh whole chili pepper or two. Then I cook them over coals.

When it comes to pork ribs, I do sometimes par boil them. As mentioned, it doesn't take long and it takes some of the fat that flairs up away. If they look leaner, I don't. I'm in the dry rub camp. There are many on the market, but you can also just hit your spice cabinet and let your imagination take you away. Right now I'd use a lot of paprika because a freind brought me a lot back from a trip she took to Hungary .....
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2006, 08:05 AM   #35
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
I think all ribs benefit from a pre-cook (preferably dry roast in foil) because the meat at the rib is not really a tender cut. It requires the collagen to be broken down to be tender by low slow cooking. That said, it isn't like a big clod of meat like a pork butt which would be chewy if just roasted over the fire. It is a small slender piece of meat so doesn't really "seem" tough and we can gnaw them there bones off!!.
Beef ribs are another quite tough piece and a slow roast first before putting on a grill make them really succulent.
__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2006, 08:27 AM   #36
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
I have not had or cooked beef ribs, but I'm sure that they can be done the same way.


~Corey123.
__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2006, 09:16 AM   #37
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Louisville, ky
Posts: 5
you cant rub the ribs with meat tenderize and seal them in a bag over night or you just have to take your time and cook them slow like everyone has said. Par-boiling ribs, to me takes most of the flavor out. try pulling off the layer of skin on the back of the ribs with a pair of pliers. this allows the heat to go all the way through the meat. baste your ribs with apple juice or apple cider vinegar too
__________________
tellytez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2006, 11:44 AM   #38
Senior Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Outside of Memphis, TN
Posts: 339
Send a message via Yahoo to FraidKnot
Quote:
Originally Posted by exactly150
Well, what do you do to get falling-off-the-bone spare ribs? I've tried to par boil on top of the stove with spices
Absolutely NOT! Ribs need to be cooked low and slow but parboiling them doesn't help.

I simply rub them with a little oil and then pat dried thyme and salt & pepper all over them. Then grill over indirect heat using lump coal for several hours, turning them periodically. If you do them in the oven, keep the heat low and as I said, cook them slowly for a long time. The thing about ribs is people tend to get impatient. You're not cooking a steak. Could take 5 hours to get those ribs falling-apart tender.

If you want to sauce the ribs, please do so after you've cooked them. Slapping sauce on them while they cook will only result in burned sauce.

Fraidy
__________________
FraidKnot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2006, 11:46 AM   #39
Senior Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Outside of Memphis, TN
Posts: 339
Send a message via Yahoo to FraidKnot
Quote:
Originally Posted by tellytez
Try pulling off the layer of skin on the back of the ribs with a pair of pliers.
Also known as silverskin, and yes it needs to be removed. It's not critical but it definitely helps.

Fraidy
__________________
FraidKnot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2006, 03:54 PM   #40
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
AKA (also known as) membrane.

Yes tellytez, that skin has to come off, otherwise the seasonings can't reach the meat and it causes the meat to shrink, draw up and toughen even more than usual!!

Yes FraidKnot, parboiling to me also, does not help at all, since, like you said, long slow cooking is the key to great-tasting tender juicy fall-off-the-bone ribs - any style or cut!!

Slow cooking helps to break down the tough fibers in the meat to make it more palatable, flavorful and tender, as well as easy to chew and swallow.

If it is going to be rushed through a fast cooking, it might just as well not be
considered at all!!

Parboiling is the old Dinosaur way to do ribs!! Most of the flavor is lost in the water that's used to boil the ribs - and then, what do you do with the water? Pour it down the drain! Along with most of the flavor that came from the meat.
__________________

__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.